Survey of aspirin use in sturge-weber syndrome

Mihee J. Bay, Eric H. Kossoff, Christoph U. Lehmann, T. Andrew Zabel, Anne M. Comi

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Sturge-Weber syndrome is a rare congenital disorder. Seizures, stroke-like episodes, glaucoma, headache, and developmental delay are frequently associated features. An Internet-based questionnaire was designed to assess the frequency of use, effectiveness, and safety of aspirin treatment in Sturge-Weber syndrome. Thirty-four of 98 subjects who completed the survey reported having used aspirin. The mean number of reported stroke-like episodes was reduced from 1.1 to 0.3 per month in the year after starting aspirin (n = 26, p =.014). The median number of seizures was significantly reduced from 3 to 1 episodes per month (n = 21, p =.002). Thirty-nine percent of subjects reported a history of complications (predominantly increased bruising or gum/nose bleeding) while on aspirin; however, none reported discontinuing aspirin because of side effects. Our study showed a significant relative reduction in both self-reported seizure frequency and stroke-like episodes after starting aspirin. It also suggests that low-dose aspirin can be safely used in these patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)692-702
Number of pages11
JournalJournal of child neurology
Volume26
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2011
Externally publishedYes

Fingerprint

Sturge-Weber Syndrome
Aspirin
Seizures
Stroke
Congenital, Hereditary, and Neonatal Diseases and Abnormalities
Gingiva
Surveys and Questionnaires
Nose
Glaucoma
Internet
Headache
Hemorrhage
Safety

Keywords

  • aspirin
  • seizures
  • stroke-like episodes
  • Sturge-Weber syndrome

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Survey of aspirin use in sturge-weber syndrome. / Bay, Mihee J.; Kossoff, Eric H.; Lehmann, Christoph U.; Zabel, T. Andrew; Comi, Anne M.

In: Journal of child neurology, Vol. 26, No. 6, 01.06.2011, p. 692-702.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bay, MJ, Kossoff, EH, Lehmann, CU, Zabel, TA & Comi, AM 2011, 'Survey of aspirin use in sturge-weber syndrome', Journal of child neurology, vol. 26, no. 6, pp. 692-702. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073810388646
Bay, Mihee J. ; Kossoff, Eric H. ; Lehmann, Christoph U. ; Zabel, T. Andrew ; Comi, Anne M. / Survey of aspirin use in sturge-weber syndrome. In: Journal of child neurology. 2011 ; Vol. 26, No. 6. pp. 692-702.
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