Sympathetic stimulation, hemodynamic factors, and indices of cardiac inotropic state

R. A. Galosy, Jere H Mitchell, James M Atkins, J. Reisch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Scopus citations

Abstract

The influence of hemodynamic factors on indices of the inotropic state of the heart were studied before and during cardiac sympathetic nerve stimulation in 23 open-chested dogs anesthetized with sodium pentobarbital. Neural reflexes and the cardiovascular system remained intact during electrical stimulation of the left ventral ansa subclavian nerve. The influence of diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), and left atrial pressure (LAP) on the maximal rate of left ventricular (LV dP/dt) and aortic pressure development (Ao dP/dt) were examined with multiple regression techniques. Diastolic blood pressure and LAP were found to be positively related to LV dP/dt during both control and nerve stimulation, with HR being negatively related to LV dP/dt during control periods, but positively related to LV dP/dt during nerve stimulation. Left atrial pressure and HR were observed to be positively related to Ao dP/dt during control and nerve stimulation, whereas DBP was negatively related to Ao dP/dt during control and nerve stimulation. A positive inotropic effect on the heart was evidenced during nerve stimulation in LV dP/dt and Ao dP/dt, regardless of the relationship with other variables. The results from these experiments indicate that both dP/dt and Ao dP/dt reflect changes in the inotropic state of the heart, but are not totally independent of intrinsic influences on cardiovascular performance of the heart.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)H562-H566
JournalAmerican Journal of Physiology - Heart and Circulatory Physiology
Volume3
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 1978

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Physiology
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine
  • Physiology (medical)

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