Synapse loss may be a minor contributor to decreased regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease

Eileen H. Bigio, Joan S. Reisch, Charles L. White, Sivapong Satumtira, Estelle Sontag, Frederick J. Bonte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In this study we tested the hypothesis that synapse loss contributes to decreased regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) in Alzheimer disease (AD). We compared ante-mortem rCBF and postmortem analysis of synaptophysin, as a measure of synapse loss, in 13 cases of AD. rCBF studies were performed using inhaled xenon gas (Xe-133), which yields quantitative results. Synapse loss was evaluated in postmortem brain samples using an enzyme-linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) that measures synaptophysin, with results expressed as picomoles synaptophysin/10 mg brain. Synaptophysin was expressed either as concentration (QS method) or as the ratio of the concentration to the combined results in frontal, temporal and parietal lobe (RS method). There was no correlation between synapse loss and rCBF using the QS method and only borderline significance between right SPECT and right temporal synaptophysin using the RS method. The results of this study suggest that synapse loss may be a minor contributor to the decreased rCBF observed in AD. Copyright

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)72-78
Number of pages7
JournalDementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders
Volume15
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

Cerebrovascular Circulation
Synaptophysin
Regional Blood Flow
Synapses
Alzheimer Disease
Parietal Lobe
Xenon
Brain
Frontal Lobe
Temporal Lobe
Single-Photon Emission-Computed Tomography
Gases
Enzymes

Keywords

  • Alzheimer disease
  • Cerebral blood flow, regional
  • SPECT
  • Synapse
  • Synaptophysin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuropsychology and Physiological Psychology
  • Geriatrics and Gerontology

Cite this

Synapse loss may be a minor contributor to decreased regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease. / Bigio, Eileen H.; Reisch, Joan S.; White, Charles L.; Satumtira, Sivapong; Sontag, Estelle; Bonte, Frederick J.

In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders, Vol. 15, No. 2, 2003, p. 72-78.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bigio, Eileen H. ; Reisch, Joan S. ; White, Charles L. ; Satumtira, Sivapong ; Sontag, Estelle ; Bonte, Frederick J. / Synapse loss may be a minor contributor to decreased regional cerebral blood flow in Alzheimer disease. In: Dementia and Geriatric Cognitive Disorders. 2003 ; Vol. 15, No. 2. pp. 72-78.
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