Systemic Diseases with Renal Manifestations

Asha Rajashekar, Mark A. Perazella, Susan Crowley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This article discusses the epidemiology, recognition, screening, and management of six systemic diseases that commonly present with renal manifestations: diabetic nephropathy, lupus nephritis, congestive heart failure, HIV, liver disease, and dysproteinemias. Diabetic nephropathy remains the leading cause of end-stage renal disease in the United States. The outlook for patients who have lupus nephritis and HIV-associated nephropathy has improved in the last decade. Kidney disease is common in patients who have advanced liver disease, and creatinine-based methods do not provide an accurate estimation of renal function in this population. Dysproteinemias are associated with protean renal manifestations, and renal disease may be the presenting manifestation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)297-328
Number of pages32
JournalPrimary Care - Clinics in Office Practice
Volume35
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2008

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Kidney
Lupus Nephritis
Diabetic Nephropathies
Liver Diseases
AIDS-Associated Nephropathy
Kidney Diseases
Chronic Kidney Failure
Creatinine
Epidemiology
Heart Failure
HIV
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Systemic Diseases with Renal Manifestations. / Rajashekar, Asha; Perazella, Mark A.; Crowley, Susan.

In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice, Vol. 35, No. 2, 06.2008, p. 297-328.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rajashekar, Asha ; Perazella, Mark A. ; Crowley, Susan. / Systemic Diseases with Renal Manifestations. In: Primary Care - Clinics in Office Practice. 2008 ; Vol. 35, No. 2. pp. 297-328.
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