Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury

G. L. Clifton, S. Allen, J. Berry, S. M. Koch

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

78 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

An extensive literature suggests that there are minimal complications of systemic hypothermia in humans at and above 30°C for periods of several days. Intracranial hemorrhage has been found to complicate profound hypothermia (10-15°C), and ventricular arrhythmias occur at temperatures below 30°C. Our initial clinical studies were with 21 patients undergoing elective craniotomy cooled to 30-32°C for 1-8 h (mean 4 h). Hypothermia was induced by surface cooling with water blankets. No complications were found. Among 11 patients with severe brain injury, cooling to levels below 32°C was associated with ventricular arrhythmias in 1 patient and atrioventricular block in 1 patient. Asymptomatic hypokalemia was found routinely and treated with potassium replacement. No intracranial hemorrhage or other complications were found. With surface cooling, intravascular temperature dropped at 1.6°C/h. Based on the safety of surface cooling to a core temperature of 32°C for 48 h, we are conducting a randomized study of this level of hypothermia in patients with severe brain injury, cooled within 6 h of injury.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalJournal of Neurotrauma
Volume9
Issue numberSUPPL. 2
StatePublished - Jan 1 1992

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Hypothermia
Brain Injuries
Intracranial Hemorrhages
Temperature
Cardiac Arrhythmias
Therapeutics
Induced Hypothermia
Hypokalemia
Atrioventricular Block
Craniotomy
Potassium
Safety
Water
Wounds and Injuries

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

Clifton, G. L., Allen, S., Berry, J., & Koch, S. M. (1992). Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury. Journal of Neurotrauma, 9(SUPPL. 2).

Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury. / Clifton, G. L.; Allen, S.; Berry, J.; Koch, S. M.

In: Journal of Neurotrauma, Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 2, 01.01.1992.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Clifton, GL, Allen, S, Berry, J & Koch, SM 1992, 'Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury', Journal of Neurotrauma, vol. 9, no. SUPPL. 2.
Clifton GL, Allen S, Berry J, Koch SM. Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury. Journal of Neurotrauma. 1992 Jan 1;9(SUPPL. 2).
Clifton, G. L. ; Allen, S. ; Berry, J. ; Koch, S. M. / Systemic hypothermia in treatment of brain injury. In: Journal of Neurotrauma. 1992 ; Vol. 9, No. SUPPL. 2.
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