T cell-derived B cell differentiation factor(s). Effect on the isotype switch of murine B cells

P. C. Isakson, E. Pure, E. S. Vitetta, P. H. Krammer

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Abstract

Culturing BALB/c B cells for 6 d at low cell density in the presence of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) results in the appearance of a small number of IgG plaque-forming cells (PFC). The addition of supernatants from concanavalin A (Con A)-induced alloreactive (AKR anti-B6) long-term T cell lines (PK 7.1.1a and 7.1.2) or a T cell hybridoma (FS7-6.18) to LPS-treated B cells resulted in a marked increase in IgG PFC (3-10-fold higher than in cultures treated with LPS alone). The number of induced IgG was not affected by removing IgG-bearing cells on the fluorescence-activated cell sorter, indicating that T cell-derived B cell differentiation factor enhances isotype switching of sIgG- cells, rather than selecting and expanding preexisting subpopulations of sIgG+ cells. We also investigated the subclass of IgG produced in the absence or presence of T cell factors and found that PK 7.1.1a, PK 7.1.2, and FS7-6.18 supernatants selectively increased IgG1 production. Several other T cell supernatants containing a variety of lymphokines had no effect, suggesting that PK 7.1.1a, PK 7.1.2, and FS7-6.18 lines produce factor(s) that can specifically enhance the recovery of IgG secreting cells in culture in the presence of LPS. These factors, which we have termed B cell differentiation factors, are different from interleukin 1, interleukin 2, T cell-replacing factor, colony-stimulating factor, macrophage-activating factor, and immune interferon. Our results suggest that soluble factors produced by T cell lines and hybridomas can markedly influence both the class and subclass of Ig produced by B cells.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)734-748
Number of pages15
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume155
Issue number3
StatePublished - 1982

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Interleukin-6
B-Lymphocytes
Immunoglobulin G
T-Lymphocytes
Lipopolysaccharides
Hybridomas
Macrophage-Activating Factors
Immunoglobulin Class Switching
TCF Transcription Factors
Colony-Stimulating Factors
Cell Line
Lymphokines
Interleukin-5
Concanavalin A
Interleukin-1
Interferon-gamma
Interleukin-2
Cell Culture Techniques
Cell Count
Fluorescence

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

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T cell-derived B cell differentiation factor(s). Effect on the isotype switch of murine B cells. / Isakson, P. C.; Pure, E.; Vitetta, E. S.; Krammer, P. H.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 155, No. 3, 1982, p. 734-748.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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