Targeted therapies

A new generation of cancer treatments

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

231 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Targeted therapies, which include monoclonal antibodies and small molecule inhibitors, have significantly changed the treatment of cancer over the past 10 years. These drugs are now a component of therapy for many common malignancies, including breast, colorectal, lung, and pancreatic cancers, as well as lymphoma, leukemia, and multiple myeloma. The mechanisms of action and toxicities of targeted therapies differ from those of traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy. Targeted therapies are generally better tolerated than traditional chemotherapy, but they are associated with several adverse effects, such as acneiform rash, cardiac dysfunction, thrombosis, hypertension, and proteinuria. Small molecule inhibitors are metabolized by cytochrome P450 enzymes and are subject to multiple drug interactions. Targeted therapy has raised new questions about the tailoring of cancer treatment to an individual patient's tumor, the assessment of drug effectiveness and toxicity, and the economics of cancer care. As more persons are diagnosed with cancer and as these patients live longer, primary care physicians will increasingly provide care for patients who have received targeted cancer therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)311-319
Number of pages9
JournalAmerican Family Physician
Volume77
Issue number3
StatePublished - Feb 1 2008

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Neoplasms
Therapeutics
Cytochrome P-450 Enzyme System
Drug Therapy
Primary Care Physicians
Exanthema
Drug-Related Side Effects and Adverse Reactions
Multiple Myeloma
Pancreatic Neoplasms
Drug Interactions
Proteinuria
Colorectal Neoplasms
Lymphoma
Lung Neoplasms
Patient Care
Leukemia
Thrombosis
Monoclonal Antibodies
Economics
Breast Neoplasms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Targeted therapies : A new generation of cancer treatments. / Gerber, David E.

In: American Family Physician, Vol. 77, No. 3, 01.02.2008, p. 311-319.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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