Technetium‐99m stannous pyrophosphate myocardial scintigraphy: Serial imaging to detect myocardial infarcts in patients

M. Falkoff, R. W. Parkey, F. J. Bonte

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Typically, technetium‐99m stannous pyrophosphate (99mTc‐PYP) myocardial scintigrams become abnormal within 10‐12 h following acute myocardial infarction. Ordinarily, the 99mTc‐PYP scintigrams become increasingly abnormal between 24 and 72 h following the infarct and then become normal 6‐7 days after the event. However, occasional patients and their 99mTc‐PYP myocardial scintigrams deviate from this expected pattern by initially developing an abnormal 99mTc‐PYP scintigram as late as 4‐5 days following an acute myocardial infarction. Others retain “persistently abnormal” 99mTc‐PYP myocardial scintigrams after their myocardial infarcts. The clinical importance and potential prognostic importance of these deviations from the expected patterns with 99mTc‐PYP myocardial imaging are discussed and the need for serial myocardial imaging is emphasized.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)163-168
Number of pages6
JournalClinical Cardiology
Volume1
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 1978

Keywords

  • myocardial scintigraphy
  • serial myocardial imaging
  • “hot spot” scintigraphy

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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