Teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence: Adding insult to injury in predicting teen dating violence

Ernest N. Jouriles, Victoria Mueller, David Rosenfield, Renee McDonald, M. Catherine Dodson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

38 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: The present study examines whether teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence (IPV) each contribute to the prediction of dating violence perpetration, and whether youth trauma symptoms mediate these hypothesized associations. Method: Participants were 88 teens (45 females) and their mothers; families were recruited from the juvenile justice system. At baseline, mothers reported on severe IPV with any current or former male partner, and teens reported on their experiences of harsh parenting and trauma symptoms. Teens reported on their dating violence perpetration in telephone interviews conducted over 3 months following the baseline assessment. Results: Teens' exposure to severe IPV and recent harsh parenting were both positively associated with teen dating violence perpetration while controlling for the effects of the other. Harsh parenting was related to general and anger-related trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms mediated the association between harsh parenting and teen dating violence perpetration. Trauma symptoms did not mediate the association between teens' exposure to severe IPV and teen dating violence perpetration. Adolescent sex moderated some of the documented associations, with stronger associations emerging for females. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a broad assessment of family aggression and violence should be considered when investigating links between youth exposure to family violence and teen dating violence perpetration.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)125-138
Number of pages14
JournalPsychology of Violence
Volume2
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2012

Fingerprint

Parenting
violence
Wounds and Injuries
experience
trauma
Domestic Violence
Intimate Partner Violence
Mothers
telephone interview
Anger
Social Justice
anger
Aggression
aggression
justice
adolescent

Keywords

  • harsh parenting
  • intimate partner violence
  • Teen dating violence
  • trauma symptoms

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Applied Psychology
  • Social Psychology
  • Health(social science)

Cite this

Teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence : Adding insult to injury in predicting teen dating violence. / Jouriles, Ernest N.; Mueller, Victoria; Rosenfield, David; McDonald, Renee; Dodson, M. Catherine.

In: Psychology of Violence, Vol. 2, No. 2, 01.04.2012, p. 125-138.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

@article{9c318b02ad0848598647ab653de0523a,
title = "Teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence: Adding insult to injury in predicting teen dating violence",
abstract = "Objective: The present study examines whether teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence (IPV) each contribute to the prediction of dating violence perpetration, and whether youth trauma symptoms mediate these hypothesized associations. Method: Participants were 88 teens (45 females) and their mothers; families were recruited from the juvenile justice system. At baseline, mothers reported on severe IPV with any current or former male partner, and teens reported on their experiences of harsh parenting and trauma symptoms. Teens reported on their dating violence perpetration in telephone interviews conducted over 3 months following the baseline assessment. Results: Teens' exposure to severe IPV and recent harsh parenting were both positively associated with teen dating violence perpetration while controlling for the effects of the other. Harsh parenting was related to general and anger-related trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms mediated the association between harsh parenting and teen dating violence perpetration. Trauma symptoms did not mediate the association between teens' exposure to severe IPV and teen dating violence perpetration. Adolescent sex moderated some of the documented associations, with stronger associations emerging for females. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a broad assessment of family aggression and violence should be considered when investigating links between youth exposure to family violence and teen dating violence perpetration.",
keywords = "harsh parenting, intimate partner violence, Teen dating violence, trauma symptoms",
author = "Jouriles, {Ernest N.} and Victoria Mueller and David Rosenfield and Renee McDonald and Dodson, {M. Catherine}",
year = "2012",
month = "4",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1037/a0027264",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "2",
pages = "125--138",
journal = "Psychology of Violence",
issn = "2152-0828",
publisher = "American Psychological Association Inc.",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - Teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence

T2 - Adding insult to injury in predicting teen dating violence

AU - Jouriles, Ernest N.

AU - Mueller, Victoria

AU - Rosenfield, David

AU - McDonald, Renee

AU - Dodson, M. Catherine

PY - 2012/4/1

Y1 - 2012/4/1

N2 - Objective: The present study examines whether teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence (IPV) each contribute to the prediction of dating violence perpetration, and whether youth trauma symptoms mediate these hypothesized associations. Method: Participants were 88 teens (45 females) and their mothers; families were recruited from the juvenile justice system. At baseline, mothers reported on severe IPV with any current or former male partner, and teens reported on their experiences of harsh parenting and trauma symptoms. Teens reported on their dating violence perpetration in telephone interviews conducted over 3 months following the baseline assessment. Results: Teens' exposure to severe IPV and recent harsh parenting were both positively associated with teen dating violence perpetration while controlling for the effects of the other. Harsh parenting was related to general and anger-related trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms mediated the association between harsh parenting and teen dating violence perpetration. Trauma symptoms did not mediate the association between teens' exposure to severe IPV and teen dating violence perpetration. Adolescent sex moderated some of the documented associations, with stronger associations emerging for females. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a broad assessment of family aggression and violence should be considered when investigating links between youth exposure to family violence and teen dating violence perpetration.

AB - Objective: The present study examines whether teens' experiences of harsh parenting and exposure to severe intimate partner violence (IPV) each contribute to the prediction of dating violence perpetration, and whether youth trauma symptoms mediate these hypothesized associations. Method: Participants were 88 teens (45 females) and their mothers; families were recruited from the juvenile justice system. At baseline, mothers reported on severe IPV with any current or former male partner, and teens reported on their experiences of harsh parenting and trauma symptoms. Teens reported on their dating violence perpetration in telephone interviews conducted over 3 months following the baseline assessment. Results: Teens' exposure to severe IPV and recent harsh parenting were both positively associated with teen dating violence perpetration while controlling for the effects of the other. Harsh parenting was related to general and anger-related trauma symptoms, and trauma symptoms mediated the association between harsh parenting and teen dating violence perpetration. Trauma symptoms did not mediate the association between teens' exposure to severe IPV and teen dating violence perpetration. Adolescent sex moderated some of the documented associations, with stronger associations emerging for females. Conclusions: The findings suggest that a broad assessment of family aggression and violence should be considered when investigating links between youth exposure to family violence and teen dating violence perpetration.

KW - harsh parenting

KW - intimate partner violence

KW - Teen dating violence

KW - trauma symptoms

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84874103854&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84874103854&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1037/a0027264

DO - 10.1037/a0027264

M3 - Article

AN - SCOPUS:84874103854

VL - 2

SP - 125

EP - 138

JO - Psychology of Violence

JF - Psychology of Violence

SN - 2152-0828

IS - 2

ER -