Temporal trends and geographic variation of lower-extremity amputation in patients with peripheral artery disease: Results from U.S. Medicare 2000-2008

W. Schuyler Jones, Manesh R. Patel, David Dai, Sumeet Subherwal, Judith Stafford, Sarah Calhoun, Eric D. Peterson

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Objectives: This study sought to characterize temporal trends, patient-specific factors, and geographic variation associated with amputation in patients with lower-extremity peripheral artery disease (LE PAD) during the study period. Background: Amputation represents the end-stage failure for those with LE PAD, and little is known about the rates and geographic variation in the use of LE amputation. Methods: By using data from the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) from January 1, 2000, to December 31, 2008, we examined national patterns of LE amputation among patients age 65 years or more with PAD. Multivariable logistic regression was used to adjust regional results for other patient demographic and clinical factors. Results: Among 2,730,742 older patients with identified PAD, the overall rate of LE amputation decreased from 7,258 per 100,000 patients with PAD to 5,790 per 100,000 (p < 0.001 for trend). Male sex, black race, diabetes mellitus, and renal disease were all independent predictors of LE amputation. The adjusted odds ratio of LE amputation per year between 2000 and 2008 was 0.95 (95% CI: 0.95-0.95, p < 0.001). Conclusions: From 2000 to 2008, LE amputation rates decreased significantly among patients with PAD. However, there remains significant patient and geographic variation in amputation rates across the United States.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)2230-2236
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the American College of Cardiology
Volume60
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012
Externally publishedYes

Keywords

  • critical limb ischemia
  • geographic variation
  • lower-extremity amputation
  • peripheral artery disease

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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