Testing Psychosis Phenotypes From Bipolar–Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes for Clinical Application: Biotype Characteristics and Targets

Brett A. Clementz, Rebekah L. Trotti, Godfrey D. Pearlson, Matcheri S. Keshavan, Elliot S. Gershon, Sarah K. Keedy, Elena I. Ivleva, Jennifer E. McDowell, Carol A. Tamminga

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

Background: Psychiatry aspires to the molecular understanding of its disorders and, with that knowledge, to precision medicine. Research supporting such goals in the dimension of psychosis has been compromised, in part, by using phenomenology alone to estimate disease entities. To this end, we are proponents of a deep phenotyping approach in psychosis, using computational strategies to discover the most informative phenotypic fingerprint as a promising strategy to uncover mechanisms in psychosis. Methods: Doing this, the Bipolar–Schizophrenia Network for Intermediate Phenotypes (B-SNIP) has used biomarkers to identify distinct subtypes of psychosis with replicable biomarker characteristics. While we have presented these entities as relevant, their potential utility in clinical practice has not yet been demonstrated. Results: Here we carried out an analysis of clinical features that characterize biotypes. We found that biotypes have unique and defining clinical characteristics that could be used as initial screens in the clinical and research settings. Differences in these clinical features appear to be consistent with biotype biomarker profiles, indicating a link between biological features and clinical presentation. Clinical features associated with biotypes differ from those associated with DSM diagnoses, indicating that biotypes and DSM syndromes are not redundant and are likely to yield different treatment predictions. We highlight 3 predictions based on biotype that are derived from individual biomarker features and cannot be obtained from DSM psychosis syndromes. Conclusions: In the future, biotypes may prove to be useful for targeting distinct molecular, circuit, cognitive, and psychosocial therapies for improved functional outcomes.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)808-818
Number of pages11
JournalBiological Psychiatry: Cognitive Neuroscience and Neuroimaging
Volume5
Issue number8
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2020

Keywords

  • Biomarkers
  • Computational neuroscience
  • Neurobiological
  • Precision medicine
  • Psychopathology
  • Transdiagnostic

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Radiology Nuclear Medicine and imaging
  • Cognitive Neuroscience
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Biological Psychiatry

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