The Aclinics are connecting with patients onlineRT of social networking

How SART member

Kenan Omurtag, Patricia T. Jimenez, Valerie Ratts, Randall Odem, Amber R. Cooper

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: To study and describe the use of social networking websites among Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member clinics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based practice. Patient(s): Not applicable. Intervention(s): Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s): Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume, and location (i.e., mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis. Result(s): A total of 384 SART-registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96% had a website and 30% linked to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89%) with social networking websites were affiliated with nonacademic centers. Social networking posts mostly provided information (31%) and/or advertising (28%), and the remaining offered support (19%) or were irrelevant (17%) to the target audience. Only 5% of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlated with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website. Conclusion(s): Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website such as Facebook, Twitter, and/or a blog. Large-volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)88-94
Number of pages7
JournalFertility and Sterility
Volume97
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2012

Fingerprint

Social Networking
Assisted Reproductive Techniques
Blogging
Social Support
Multivariate Analysis
Cross-Sectional Studies
Regression Analysis
Outcome Assessment (Health Care)

Keywords

  • assisted reproductive technology
  • blogs
  • Facebook
  • In vitro fertilization
  • infertility
  • internet
  • social networks
  • Twitter

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Obstetrics and Gynecology
  • Reproductive Medicine

Cite this

The Aclinics are connecting with patients onlineRT of social networking : How SART member. / Omurtag, Kenan; Jimenez, Patricia T.; Ratts, Valerie; Odem, Randall; Cooper, Amber R.

In: Fertility and Sterility, Vol. 97, No. 1, 01.2012, p. 88-94.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Omurtag, Kenan ; Jimenez, Patricia T. ; Ratts, Valerie ; Odem, Randall ; Cooper, Amber R. / The Aclinics are connecting with patients onlineRT of social networking : How SART member. In: Fertility and Sterility. 2012 ; Vol. 97, No. 1. pp. 88-94.
@article{ccffd1eb9c634bc6b519a3fb86262a5e,
title = "The Aclinics are connecting with patients onlineRT of social networking: How SART member",
abstract = "Objective: To study and describe the use of social networking websites among Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member clinics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based practice. Patient(s): Not applicable. Intervention(s): Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s): Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume, and location (i.e., mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis. Result(s): A total of 384 SART-registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96{\%} had a website and 30{\%} linked to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89{\%}) with social networking websites were affiliated with nonacademic centers. Social networking posts mostly provided information (31{\%}) and/or advertising (28{\%}), and the remaining offered support (19{\%}) or were irrelevant (17{\%}) to the target audience. Only 5{\%} of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlated with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website. Conclusion(s): Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website such as Facebook, Twitter, and/or a blog. Large-volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice.",
keywords = "assisted reproductive technology, blogs, Facebook, In vitro fertilization, infertility, internet, social networks, Twitter",
author = "Kenan Omurtag and Jimenez, {Patricia T.} and Valerie Ratts and Randall Odem and Cooper, {Amber R.}",
year = "2012",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.10.001",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "97",
pages = "88--94",
journal = "Fertility and Sterility",
issn = "0015-0282",
publisher = "Elsevier Inc.",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The Aclinics are connecting with patients onlineRT of social networking

T2 - How SART member

AU - Omurtag, Kenan

AU - Jimenez, Patricia T.

AU - Ratts, Valerie

AU - Odem, Randall

AU - Cooper, Amber R.

PY - 2012/1

Y1 - 2012/1

N2 - Objective: To study and describe the use of social networking websites among Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member clinics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based practice. Patient(s): Not applicable. Intervention(s): Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s): Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume, and location (i.e., mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis. Result(s): A total of 384 SART-registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96% had a website and 30% linked to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89%) with social networking websites were affiliated with nonacademic centers. Social networking posts mostly provided information (31%) and/or advertising (28%), and the remaining offered support (19%) or were irrelevant (17%) to the target audience. Only 5% of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlated with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website. Conclusion(s): Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website such as Facebook, Twitter, and/or a blog. Large-volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice.

AB - Objective: To study and describe the use of social networking websites among Society for Assisted Reproductive Technology (SART) member clinics. Design: Cross-sectional study. Setting: University-based practice. Patient(s): Not applicable. Intervention(s): Not applicable. Main Outcome Measure(s): Prevalence of social networking websites among SART member clinics and evaluation of content, volume, and location (i.e., mandated state, region) using multivariate regression analysis. Result(s): A total of 384 SART-registered clinics and 1,382 social networking posts were evaluated. Of the clinics, 96% had a website and 30% linked to a social networking website. The majority of clinics (89%) with social networking websites were affiliated with nonacademic centers. Social networking posts mostly provided information (31%) and/or advertising (28%), and the remaining offered support (19%) or were irrelevant (17%) to the target audience. Only 5% of posts involved patients requesting information. Clinic volume correlated with the presence of a clinic website and a social networking website. Conclusion(s): Almost all SART member clinics have a website. Nearly one-third of these clinics host a social networking website such as Facebook, Twitter, and/or a blog. Large-volume clinics commonly host social networking websites. These sites provide new ways to communicate with patients, but clinics should maintain policies on the incorporation of social networks into practice.

KW - assisted reproductive technology

KW - blogs

KW - Facebook

KW - In vitro fertilization

KW - infertility

KW - internet

KW - social networks

KW - Twitter

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84155164454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84155164454&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.10.001

DO - 10.1016/j.fertnstert.2011.10.001

M3 - Article

VL - 97

SP - 88

EP - 94

JO - Fertility and Sterility

JF - Fertility and Sterility

SN - 0015-0282

IS - 1

ER -