The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians: A 14-year population-based study

Mark S. Kaplan, Nathalie Huguet, David Feeny, Bentson H. McFarland, Raul Caetano, Julie Bernier, Norman Giesbrecht, Lisa Oliver, Pamela Ramage-Morin, Nancy A. Ross

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Studies have shown that moderate alcohol use confers protection against some of the dominant predictors of long-term care placement, including diminished cognitive functioning, physical disability, and injury. But little is known about the association between alcohol use and the likelihood of placement in long-term care facilities. A nationally representative sample of 5404 community-dwelling Canadians ages 50. years and older at baseline (1994/95) was obtained from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey. Alcohol use categories were developed based on the quantity and frequency of use in the 12. months before the interview. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between alcohol use at baseline and subsequent placement in long-term care facilities after adjusting for covariates measured at baseline. During the 14-year follow-up period, 14% of lifetime abstainers, 10% of former drinkers, 7% of infrequent drinkers, 4% of moderate drinkers, and 3% of heavy drinkers were placed in long-term care facilities. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that abstainers, former drinkers, and infrequent drinkers were more than twice as likely to be placed in long-term care as moderate drinkers. Moderate drinking was protective against placement in long-term care facilities even after adjusting for an array of well-known confounders. The strong protective effect of moderate alcohol use on long-term care entry is likely due to a complex mix of physical, cognitive and psychosocial health factors.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)219-224
Number of pages6
JournalAddictive Behaviors
Volume39
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2014

Fingerprint

Long-Term Care
Alcohols
Population
Independent Living
Hazards
Health
Health Surveys
Proportional Hazards Models
Drinking
Multivariate Analysis
Interviews
Psychology
Wounds and Injuries

Keywords

  • Alcohol
  • Long-term care placement
  • Older adult

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Psychiatry and Mental health
  • Clinical Psychology
  • Toxicology
  • Medicine (miscellaneous)

Cite this

Kaplan, M. S., Huguet, N., Feeny, D., McFarland, B. H., Caetano, R., Bernier, J., ... Ross, N. A. (2014). The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians: A 14-year population-based study. Addictive Behaviors, 39(1), 219-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.09.031

The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians : A 14-year population-based study. / Kaplan, Mark S.; Huguet, Nathalie; Feeny, David; McFarland, Bentson H.; Caetano, Raul; Bernier, Julie; Giesbrecht, Norman; Oliver, Lisa; Ramage-Morin, Pamela; Ross, Nancy A.

In: Addictive Behaviors, Vol. 39, No. 1, 01.2014, p. 219-224.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaplan, MS, Huguet, N, Feeny, D, McFarland, BH, Caetano, R, Bernier, J, Giesbrecht, N, Oliver, L, Ramage-Morin, P & Ross, NA 2014, 'The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians: A 14-year population-based study', Addictive Behaviors, vol. 39, no. 1, pp. 219-224. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.09.031
Kaplan, Mark S. ; Huguet, Nathalie ; Feeny, David ; McFarland, Bentson H. ; Caetano, Raul ; Bernier, Julie ; Giesbrecht, Norman ; Oliver, Lisa ; Ramage-Morin, Pamela ; Ross, Nancy A. / The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians : A 14-year population-based study. In: Addictive Behaviors. 2014 ; Vol. 39, No. 1. pp. 219-224.
@article{61dbcd9d47844384a6ed4cc5e566b0c6,
title = "The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians: A 14-year population-based study",
abstract = "Studies have shown that moderate alcohol use confers protection against some of the dominant predictors of long-term care placement, including diminished cognitive functioning, physical disability, and injury. But little is known about the association between alcohol use and the likelihood of placement in long-term care facilities. A nationally representative sample of 5404 community-dwelling Canadians ages 50. years and older at baseline (1994/95) was obtained from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey. Alcohol use categories were developed based on the quantity and frequency of use in the 12. months before the interview. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between alcohol use at baseline and subsequent placement in long-term care facilities after adjusting for covariates measured at baseline. During the 14-year follow-up period, 14{\%} of lifetime abstainers, 10{\%} of former drinkers, 7{\%} of infrequent drinkers, 4{\%} of moderate drinkers, and 3{\%} of heavy drinkers were placed in long-term care facilities. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that abstainers, former drinkers, and infrequent drinkers were more than twice as likely to be placed in long-term care as moderate drinkers. Moderate drinking was protective against placement in long-term care facilities even after adjusting for an array of well-known confounders. The strong protective effect of moderate alcohol use on long-term care entry is likely due to a complex mix of physical, cognitive and psychosocial health factors.",
keywords = "Alcohol, Long-term care placement, Older adult",
author = "Kaplan, {Mark S.} and Nathalie Huguet and David Feeny and McFarland, {Bentson H.} and Raul Caetano and Julie Bernier and Norman Giesbrecht and Lisa Oliver and Pamela Ramage-Morin and Ross, {Nancy A.}",
year = "2014",
month = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.09.031",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "39",
pages = "219--224",
journal = "Addictive Behaviors",
issn = "0306-4603",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",
number = "1",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The association between alcohol use and long-term care placement among older Canadians

T2 - A 14-year population-based study

AU - Kaplan, Mark S.

AU - Huguet, Nathalie

AU - Feeny, David

AU - McFarland, Bentson H.

AU - Caetano, Raul

AU - Bernier, Julie

AU - Giesbrecht, Norman

AU - Oliver, Lisa

AU - Ramage-Morin, Pamela

AU - Ross, Nancy A.

PY - 2014/1

Y1 - 2014/1

N2 - Studies have shown that moderate alcohol use confers protection against some of the dominant predictors of long-term care placement, including diminished cognitive functioning, physical disability, and injury. But little is known about the association between alcohol use and the likelihood of placement in long-term care facilities. A nationally representative sample of 5404 community-dwelling Canadians ages 50. years and older at baseline (1994/95) was obtained from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey. Alcohol use categories were developed based on the quantity and frequency of use in the 12. months before the interview. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between alcohol use at baseline and subsequent placement in long-term care facilities after adjusting for covariates measured at baseline. During the 14-year follow-up period, 14% of lifetime abstainers, 10% of former drinkers, 7% of infrequent drinkers, 4% of moderate drinkers, and 3% of heavy drinkers were placed in long-term care facilities. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that abstainers, former drinkers, and infrequent drinkers were more than twice as likely to be placed in long-term care as moderate drinkers. Moderate drinking was protective against placement in long-term care facilities even after adjusting for an array of well-known confounders. The strong protective effect of moderate alcohol use on long-term care entry is likely due to a complex mix of physical, cognitive and psychosocial health factors.

AB - Studies have shown that moderate alcohol use confers protection against some of the dominant predictors of long-term care placement, including diminished cognitive functioning, physical disability, and injury. But little is known about the association between alcohol use and the likelihood of placement in long-term care facilities. A nationally representative sample of 5404 community-dwelling Canadians ages 50. years and older at baseline (1994/95) was obtained from the longitudinal National Population Health Survey. Alcohol use categories were developed based on the quantity and frequency of use in the 12. months before the interview. Cox proportional hazards models were used to estimate the association between alcohol use at baseline and subsequent placement in long-term care facilities after adjusting for covariates measured at baseline. During the 14-year follow-up period, 14% of lifetime abstainers, 10% of former drinkers, 7% of infrequent drinkers, 4% of moderate drinkers, and 3% of heavy drinkers were placed in long-term care facilities. Furthermore, the multivariate analysis revealed that abstainers, former drinkers, and infrequent drinkers were more than twice as likely to be placed in long-term care as moderate drinkers. Moderate drinking was protective against placement in long-term care facilities even after adjusting for an array of well-known confounders. The strong protective effect of moderate alcohol use on long-term care entry is likely due to a complex mix of physical, cognitive and psychosocial health factors.

KW - Alcohol

KW - Long-term care placement

KW - Older adult

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84890197835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84890197835&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.09.031

DO - 10.1016/j.addbeh.2013.09.031

M3 - Article

C2 - 24169370

AN - SCOPUS:84890197835

VL - 39

SP - 219

EP - 224

JO - Addictive Behaviors

JF - Addictive Behaviors

SN - 0306-4603

IS - 1

ER -