The Association of Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity with Different Measurements of Metabolic Syndrome: The Jackson Heart Study

Robert Booker, Bettina M. Beech, Marino A. Bruce, Roland J. Thorpe, Keith C. Norris, Elizabeth Heitman, Robert L. Newton, Megan E. Holmes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

Abstract

Purpose: Cross-sectional investigation of the association of sedentary behavior and physical activity with metabolic syndrome (MetS) among the African American participants in the Jackson Heart Study (JHS). Methods: Prevalence, number of individual components, and MetS severity z-score (MetS-Z) were examined. MetS was classified using ATP-III thresholds. MetS-Z was calculated using sex-, race-, and ethnicity-specific formulas. Sedentary behavior and physical activity were calculated from the JHS Physical Activity Cohort survey (JPAC). Associations between sedentary behavior and physical activity with MetS were assessed by logistic, negative binomial, and ordinary least squares regressions. Results: The mean participant age (N = 3370) was 61.7 ± 11.9 years and most were female (63.9%). Among all participants, 60.5% were classified with MetS. Overall MetS-Z was moderately high (.31 ± 1.07). Most waking hours were sedentary, with just under 40 daily minutes of self-reported physical activity. Physical activity was associated with lower prevalence of MetS the number of individual components, and MetS-Z score (p <.05). Sedentary behavior was not associated with MetS in any fully adjusted models (p >.05). Conclusions: Physical activity was associated with lower cardiometabolic risk, irrespective of sedentary behavior. Further studies are needed to better understand why no relation was found between sedentary behavior and cardiometabolic risk in this cohort of African American adults.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalAmerican Journal of Lifestyle Medicine
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - 2022

Keywords

  • African Americans
  • cardiometabolic risk
  • Metabolic syndrome
  • movement behaviors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine (miscellaneous)
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'The Association of Sedentary Behavior and Physical Activity with Different Measurements of Metabolic Syndrome: The Jackson Heart Study'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this