The balance of immune responses: Costimulation verse coinhibition

Sumit K. Subudhi, Maria Luisa Alegre, Yang Xin Fu

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

59 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Many of the B7 superfamily members (e.g., B7-1, B7-2, ICOS-L, B7-H1, B7-DC) were initially characterized as T cell costimulatory molecules. However, more recently it has become clear they can also coinhibit T cell responses. We review many of the B7 family members, with a particular focus on B7-H1, and examine their role in autoimmunity, transplant rejection, and cancer pathogenesis. It is crucial to understand that many B7 family members have opposing effects on an immune response. This cautions against using clinical immunotherapeutic reagents targeted against these molecules until we gain a better understanding of the circumstances that regulate the outcomes of the T cell response.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)193-202
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Molecular Medicine
Volume83
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2005

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T-Lymphocytes
Graft Rejection
Autoimmunity
Neoplasms

Keywords

  • B7 family
  • Coinhibition
  • Costimulation
  • Lymphocytes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The balance of immune responses : Costimulation verse coinhibition. / Subudhi, Sumit K.; Alegre, Maria Luisa; Fu, Yang Xin.

In: Journal of Molecular Medicine, Vol. 83, No. 3, 01.03.2005, p. 193-202.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

Subudhi, Sumit K. ; Alegre, Maria Luisa ; Fu, Yang Xin. / The balance of immune responses : Costimulation verse coinhibition. In: Journal of Molecular Medicine. 2005 ; Vol. 83, No. 3. pp. 193-202.
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