The Biobehavioral Family Model: Close relationships and allostatic load

Jacob B. Priest, Sarah B. Woods, Candice A. Maier, Elizabeth Oshrin Parker, Jenna A. Benoit, Tara R. Roush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

11 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Rationale: This study tested the inclusion of allostatic load as an expansion of the biobehavioral reactivity measurement in the Biobehavioral Family Model (BBFM). The BBFM is a biopsychosocial approach to health which proposes biobehavioral reactivity (anxiety and depression) mediates the relationship between family emotional climate and disease activity. Methods: Data for this study included a subsample of n = 1255 single and married, English-speaking adult participants (57% female, M age = 56 years) from the National Survey of Midlife Development in the United States (MIDUS II), a nationally representative epidemiological study of health and aging in the United States. Participants completed self-reported measures of family and marital functioning, anxiety and depression (biobehavioral reactivity), number of chronic health conditions, number of prescribed medications, and a biological protocol in which the following indices were obtained: cardiovascular functioning, sympathetic and parasympathetic nervous system activity, hypothalamic pituitary adrenal axis activity, inflammation, lipid/fat metabolism, and glucose metabolism. Results: Structural equation modeling indicated good fit of the data to the hypothesized family model (χ 2 = 125.13 p = .00, SRMR = .03, CFI = .96, TLI = .94, RMSEA = .04) and hypothesized couple model (χ2 = 132.67, p = .00, SRMR = .04, CFI = .95, TLI = .93, RMSEA = .04). Negative family interactions predicted biobehavioral reactivity for anxiety and depression and allostatic load; however couple interactions predicted only depression and anxiety measures of biobehavioral reactivity. Conclusion: Findings suggest the importance of incorporating physiological data in measuring biobehavioral reactivity as a predicting factor in the overall BBFM model.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)232-240
Number of pages9
JournalSocial Science and Medicine
Volume142
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2015

Fingerprint

Allostasis
Anxiety
Depression
anxiety
Health
health
Parasympathetic Nervous System
Sympathetic Nervous System
interaction
Biobehavioral Sciences
Reactivity
Lipid Metabolism
speaking
Epidemiologic Studies
medication
Fats
inclusion
climate
Inflammation
Disease

Keywords

  • Anxiety
  • Biopsychosocial
  • Couple relationships
  • Depression
  • Family
  • Physical health

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Health(social science)
  • History and Philosophy of Science

Cite this

The Biobehavioral Family Model : Close relationships and allostatic load. / Priest, Jacob B.; Woods, Sarah B.; Maier, Candice A.; Parker, Elizabeth Oshrin; Benoit, Jenna A.; Roush, Tara R.

In: Social Science and Medicine, Vol. 142, 01.10.2015, p. 232-240.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Priest, Jacob B. ; Woods, Sarah B. ; Maier, Candice A. ; Parker, Elizabeth Oshrin ; Benoit, Jenna A. ; Roush, Tara R. / The Biobehavioral Family Model : Close relationships and allostatic load. In: Social Science and Medicine. 2015 ; Vol. 142. pp. 232-240.
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