The biology of hematopoietic stem cells

Sean J. Morrison, Nobuko Uchida, Irving L. Weissman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

584 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) are the only cells in the blood-forming tissues that can give rise to all blood cell types and that can self-renew to produce more HSC. In mouse and human, HSC represent up to 0.05% of cells in the bone marrow. HSC are almost entirely responsible for the radioprotective and short- and long-term reconstituting effects observed after bone marrow transplantation. The subsets of HSC that give rise to short-term vs long-term multilineage reconstitution can be separated by phenotype, demonstrating that the fates of HSC are intrinsically determined. Here we review the ontogeny and biology of HSC, their expression of fate-determining genes, and the clinical importance of HSC for transplantation and gene therapy.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)35-71
Number of pages37
JournalAnnual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology
Volume11
StatePublished - 1995

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Hematopoietic Stem Cells
Blood Cells
Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation
Cell- and Tissue-Based Therapy
Bone Marrow Transplantation
Bone Marrow Cells
Genetic Therapy
Phenotype
Genes

Keywords

  • differentiation
  • mobilization
  • multipotent progenitor
  • self-renewal
  • transplantation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Developmental Biology
  • Cell Biology

Cite this

The biology of hematopoietic stem cells. / Morrison, Sean J.; Uchida, Nobuko; Weissman, Irving L.

In: Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology, Vol. 11, 1995, p. 35-71.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Morrison, Sean J. ; Uchida, Nobuko ; Weissman, Irving L. / The biology of hematopoietic stem cells. In: Annual Review of Cell and Developmental Biology. 1995 ; Vol. 11. pp. 35-71.
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