The c-Myc target gene network

Chi V. Dang, Kathryn A O'Donnell-Mendell, Karen I. Zeller, Tam Nguyen, Rebecca C. Osthus, Feng Li

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

655 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

For more than a decade, numerous studies have suggested that the c-Myc oncogenic protein is likely to broadly influence the composition of the transcriptome. However, the evidence required to support this notion was made available only recently, much to the anticipation of an eagerly awaiting field. In the past 5 years, many high-throughput screens based on microarray gene expression profiling, serial analysis of gene expression (SAGE), chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) followed by genomic array analysis, and Myc-methylase chimeric proteins have generated a wealth of information regarding Myc responsive and target genes. From these studies, the c-Myc target gene network is estimated to comprise about 15% of all genes from flies to humans. Both genomic and functional analyses of c-Myc targets suggest that while c-Myc behaves as a global regulator of transcription, groups of genes involved in cell cycle regulation, metabolism, ribosome biogenesis, protein synthesis, and mitochondrial function are over-represented in the c-Myc target gene network. c-Myc also consistently represses genes involved in cell growth arrest and cell adhesion. The overexpression of c-Myc predisposes cells to apoptosis under nutrient or growth factor deprivation conditions, although the critical sets of genes involved remain elusive. Despite tremendous advances, the downstream target genes that distinguish between physiologic and tumorigenic functions of c-Myc remain to be delineated.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)253-264
Number of pages12
JournalSeminars in Cancer Biology
Volume16
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 2006

Fingerprint

myc Genes
Gene Regulatory Networks
Genes
Protein Methyltransferases
Proto-Oncogene Proteins c-myc
Chromatin Immunoprecipitation
Mitochondrial Proteins
Gene Expression Profiling
Ribosomes
Transcriptome
Cell Adhesion
Diptera
Intercellular Signaling Peptides and Proteins
Cell Cycle
Apoptosis
Gene Expression
Food
Growth

Keywords

  • Myc
  • Target genes
  • Transcription
  • Tumorigenesis

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cancer Research

Cite this

Dang, C. V., O'Donnell-Mendell, K. A., Zeller, K. I., Nguyen, T., Osthus, R. C., & Li, F. (2006). The c-Myc target gene network. Seminars in Cancer Biology, 16(4), 253-264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2006.07.014

The c-Myc target gene network. / Dang, Chi V.; O'Donnell-Mendell, Kathryn A; Zeller, Karen I.; Nguyen, Tam; Osthus, Rebecca C.; Li, Feng.

In: Seminars in Cancer Biology, Vol. 16, No. 4, 08.2006, p. 253-264.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dang, CV, O'Donnell-Mendell, KA, Zeller, KI, Nguyen, T, Osthus, RC & Li, F 2006, 'The c-Myc target gene network', Seminars in Cancer Biology, vol. 16, no. 4, pp. 253-264. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.semcancer.2006.07.014
Dang, Chi V. ; O'Donnell-Mendell, Kathryn A ; Zeller, Karen I. ; Nguyen, Tam ; Osthus, Rebecca C. ; Li, Feng. / The c-Myc target gene network. In: Seminars in Cancer Biology. 2006 ; Vol. 16, No. 4. pp. 253-264.
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