The calcium channel blocker controversy

Norman M Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

5 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

A major controversy about the safety of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) has arisen since the publication of a case-control study showing that hypertensives who suffered an acute myocardial infarction (MI) were more likely than hypertensives who had not had an MI to be taking one of these (short-acting) agents than other antihypertensive agents. This study was accompanied by a republication of older studies showing that large doses of short-acting nifedipine given to post-MI patients increased their mortality rate. The danger of massive doses of short-acting nifedipine in a post-MI patient is real but irrelevant to current practice. On the other hand, the putative dangers of short-acting CCBs in the treatment of hypertension do not apply to the current use of long-acting CCBs. Therefore the scare over their use is both irrational and unfortunate.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)57-64
Number of pages8
JournalHypertension Research - Clinical and Experimental
Volume19
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1996

Fingerprint

Calcium Channel Blockers
Myocardial Infarction
Nifedipine
Antihypertensive Agents
Publications
Case-Control Studies
Hypertension
Safety
Mortality
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • Calcium channel blockers
  • Coronary disease
  • Hypertension

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Internal Medicine

Cite this

The calcium channel blocker controversy. / Kaplan, Norman M.

In: Hypertension Research - Clinical and Experimental, Vol. 19, No. 2, 1996, p. 57-64.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kaplan, Norman M. / The calcium channel blocker controversy. In: Hypertension Research - Clinical and Experimental. 1996 ; Vol. 19, No. 2. pp. 57-64.
@article{0ef0c5c828a743d8b58667ad889f3388,
title = "The calcium channel blocker controversy",
abstract = "A major controversy about the safety of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) has arisen since the publication of a case-control study showing that hypertensives who suffered an acute myocardial infarction (MI) were more likely than hypertensives who had not had an MI to be taking one of these (short-acting) agents than other antihypertensive agents. This study was accompanied by a republication of older studies showing that large doses of short-acting nifedipine given to post-MI patients increased their mortality rate. The danger of massive doses of short-acting nifedipine in a post-MI patient is real but irrelevant to current practice. On the other hand, the putative dangers of short-acting CCBs in the treatment of hypertension do not apply to the current use of long-acting CCBs. Therefore the scare over their use is both irrational and unfortunate.",
keywords = "Calcium channel blockers, Coronary disease, Hypertension",
author = "Kaplan, {Norman M}",
year = "1996",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "19",
pages = "57--64",
journal = "Hypertension Research",
issn = "0916-9636",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "2",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The calcium channel blocker controversy

AU - Kaplan, Norman M

PY - 1996

Y1 - 1996

N2 - A major controversy about the safety of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) has arisen since the publication of a case-control study showing that hypertensives who suffered an acute myocardial infarction (MI) were more likely than hypertensives who had not had an MI to be taking one of these (short-acting) agents than other antihypertensive agents. This study was accompanied by a republication of older studies showing that large doses of short-acting nifedipine given to post-MI patients increased their mortality rate. The danger of massive doses of short-acting nifedipine in a post-MI patient is real but irrelevant to current practice. On the other hand, the putative dangers of short-acting CCBs in the treatment of hypertension do not apply to the current use of long-acting CCBs. Therefore the scare over their use is both irrational and unfortunate.

AB - A major controversy about the safety of calcium channel blockers (CCBs) has arisen since the publication of a case-control study showing that hypertensives who suffered an acute myocardial infarction (MI) were more likely than hypertensives who had not had an MI to be taking one of these (short-acting) agents than other antihypertensive agents. This study was accompanied by a republication of older studies showing that large doses of short-acting nifedipine given to post-MI patients increased their mortality rate. The danger of massive doses of short-acting nifedipine in a post-MI patient is real but irrelevant to current practice. On the other hand, the putative dangers of short-acting CCBs in the treatment of hypertension do not apply to the current use of long-acting CCBs. Therefore the scare over their use is both irrational and unfortunate.

KW - Calcium channel blockers

KW - Coronary disease

KW - Hypertension

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=0030055925&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=0030055925&partnerID=8YFLogxK

M3 - Article

C2 - 10968196

AN - SCOPUS:0030055925

VL - 19

SP - 57

EP - 64

JO - Hypertension Research

JF - Hypertension Research

SN - 0916-9636

IS - 2

ER -