The cardiovascular burden of coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) with a focus on congenital heart disease

Weiyi Tan, Jamil Aboulhosn

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

135 Scopus citations

Abstract

Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19), caused by a novel betacoronavirus severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus 2 (SARS-CoV-2), was first described in a cluster of patients presenting with pneumonia symptoms in Wuhan, China, in December of 2019. Over the past few months, COVID-19 has developed into a worldwide pandemic, with over 400,000 documented cases globally as of March 24, 2020. The SARS-CoV-2 virus is most likely of zoonotic origin, but has been shown to have effective human-to-human transmission. COVID-19 results in mild symptoms in the majority of infected patients, but can cause severe lung injury, cardiac injury, and death. Given the novel nature of COVID-19, no established treatment beyond supportive care exists currently, but extensive public-health measures to reduce person-to-person transmission of COVID-19 have been implemented globally to curb the spread of disease, reduce the burden on healthcare systems, and protect vulnerable populations, including the elderly and those with underlying medical comorbidities. Since this is an emerging infectious disease, there is, as of yet, limited data on the effects of this infection on patients with cardiovascular disease, particularly so for those with congenital heart disease. We summarize herewith the early experience with COVID-19 and consider the potential applicability to and implications for patients with cardiovascular disease in general and congenital heart disease in particular.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)70-77
Number of pages8
JournalInternational Journal of Cardiology
Volume309
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 15 2020
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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