The Cardiovascular Health of Urban African Americans: Diet-Related Results from the Genes, Nutrition, Exercise, Wellness, and Spiritual Growth (GoodNEWS) Trial

Jo Ann S Carson, Linda Michalsky, Bernadette Latson, Kamakki Banks, Liyue Tong, Nora Gimpel, Jenny J. Lee, Mark J. DeHaven

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

African Americans have a higher incidence of cardiovascular disease (CVD) than Americans in general and are thus prime targets for efforts to reduce CVD risk. Dietary intake data were obtained from African Americans participating in the Genes, Nutrition, Exercise, Wellness, and Spiritual Growth (GoodNEWS) Trial. The 286 women and 75 men who participated had a mean age of 49 years; 53% had hypertension, 65% had dyslipidemia, and 51% met criteria for metabolic syndrome. Their dietary intakes were compared with American Heart Association and National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute nutrition parameters to identify areas for improvement to reduce CVD risk in this group of urban church members in Dallas, TX. Results from administration of the Dietary History Questionnaire indicated median daily intakes of 33.6% of energy from total fat, 10.3% of energy from saturated fat, 171 mg cholesterol, 16.3 g dietary fiber, and 2,453 mg sodium. A beneficial median intake of 2.9 cups fruits and vegetables per day was coupled with only 2.7 oz fish/week and an excessive intake of 13 tsp added sugar/day. These data indicate several changes needed to bring the diets of these individuals-and likely many other urban African Americans-in line with national recommendations, including reduction of saturated fat, sodium, and sugar intake, in addition to increased intake of fatty fish and whole grains. The frequent inclusion of vegetables should be encouraged in ways that promote achievement of recommended intakes of energy, fat, fiber, and sodium.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1852-1858
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics
Volume112
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2012

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Urban Health
African Americans
cardiovascular diseases
exercise
Fats
sodium
Exercise
nutrition
Diet
Cardiovascular Diseases
food intake
Sodium
energy intake
dietary fiber
Growth
Energy Intake
vegetables
diet
Vegetables
Genes

Keywords

  • Cardiovascular diseases
  • Diet
  • Nutrition
  • Risk factors

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Food Science
  • Nutrition and Dietetics

Cite this

The Cardiovascular Health of Urban African Americans : Diet-Related Results from the Genes, Nutrition, Exercise, Wellness, and Spiritual Growth (GoodNEWS) Trial. / Carson, Jo Ann S; Michalsky, Linda; Latson, Bernadette; Banks, Kamakki; Tong, Liyue; Gimpel, Nora; Lee, Jenny J.; DeHaven, Mark J.

In: Journal of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics, Vol. 112, No. 11, 11.2012, p. 1852-1858.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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