The cis-acting DNA sequences required in vivo for bacteriophage Mu helper-mediated transposition and packaging

Josée Harel, Linda Duplessis, Jeffrey Kahn, Michael S. DuBow

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Scopus citations

Abstract

The 37,000 bp double-stranded DNA genome of bacteriophage Mu behaves as a plaque-forming transposable element of Escherichia coli. We have defined the cis-acting DNA sequences required in vivo for transposition and packaging of the viral genome by monitoring the transposition and maturation of Mu DNA-containing pSC101 and pBR322 plasmids with an induced helper Mu prophage to provide the trans-acting functions. We found that nucleotides 1 to 54 of the Mu left end define an essential domain for transposition, and that sequences between nucleotides 126 and 203, and between 203 and 1,699, define two auxiliary domains that stimulate transposition in vivo. At the right extremity, the essential sequences for transposition require not more than the first 62 base pairs (bp), although the presence of sequences between 63 and 117 bp from the right end increases the transposition frequency about 15-fold in our system. Finally, we have delineated the pac recognition site for DNA maturation to nucleotides 32 to 54 of the Mu left end which reside inside of the first transposase binding site (L1) located between nucleotides 1-30. Thus, the transposase binding site and packaging domains of bacteriophage Mu DNA can be separated into two well-defined regions which do not appear to overlap.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)67-72
Number of pages6
JournalArchives of Microbiology
Volume154
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 1990

Keywords

  • Cis-acting DNA sequences
  • DNA transposition
  • Escherichia coli
  • Phage Mu
  • Virus encapsidation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Microbiology
  • Biochemistry
  • Molecular Biology
  • Genetics

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