The Effect of In-School Saccadic Training on Reading Fluency and Comprehension in First and Second Grade Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial

David Dodick, Amaal J. Starling, Jennifer Wethe, Yi Pang, Leonard V. Messner, Craig Smith, Christina L. Master, Rashmi B. Halker-Singh, Bert B. Vargas, Jamie M. Bogle, Jay Mandrekar, Alexandra Talaber, Danielle Leong

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

7 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Efficient eye movements provide a physical foundation for proficient reading skills. We investigated the effect of in-school saccadic training on reading performance. In this cross-over design, study participants (n = 327, 165 males; mean age [SD]: 7 y 6 mo [1y 1 mo]) were randomized into treatment and control groups, who then underwent eighteen 20-minute training sessions over 5 weeks using King-Devick Reading Acceleration Program Software. Pre- and posttreatment reading assessments included fluency, comprehension, and rapid number naming performance. The treatment group had significantly greater improvement than the control group in fluency (6.2% vs 3.6%, P =.0277) and comprehension (7.5% vs 1.5%, P =.0002). The high-needs student group significantly improved in fluency (P <.001) and comprehension (P <.001). We hypothesize these improvements to be attributed to the repetitive practice of reading-related eye movements, shifting visuospatial attention, and visual processing. Consideration should be given to teaching the physical act of reading within the early education curriculum.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)104-111
Number of pages8
JournalJournal of Child Neurology
Volume32
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2017

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Reading
Randomized Controlled Trials
Students
Eye Movements
Control Groups
Curriculum
Cross-Over Studies
Teaching
Software
Education
Therapeutics

Keywords

  • eye movements
  • intervention
  • randomized controlled trial
  • reading
  • saccadic training

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The Effect of In-School Saccadic Training on Reading Fluency and Comprehension in First and Second Grade Students : A Randomized Controlled Trial. / Dodick, David; Starling, Amaal J.; Wethe, Jennifer; Pang, Yi; Messner, Leonard V.; Smith, Craig; Master, Christina L.; Halker-Singh, Rashmi B.; Vargas, Bert B.; Bogle, Jamie M.; Mandrekar, Jay; Talaber, Alexandra; Leong, Danielle.

In: Journal of Child Neurology, Vol. 32, No. 1, 01.01.2017, p. 104-111.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Dodick, D, Starling, AJ, Wethe, J, Pang, Y, Messner, LV, Smith, C, Master, CL, Halker-Singh, RB, Vargas, BB, Bogle, JM, Mandrekar, J, Talaber, A & Leong, D 2017, 'The Effect of In-School Saccadic Training on Reading Fluency and Comprehension in First and Second Grade Students: A Randomized Controlled Trial', Journal of Child Neurology, vol. 32, no. 1, pp. 104-111. https://doi.org/10.1177/0883073816668704
Dodick, David ; Starling, Amaal J. ; Wethe, Jennifer ; Pang, Yi ; Messner, Leonard V. ; Smith, Craig ; Master, Christina L. ; Halker-Singh, Rashmi B. ; Vargas, Bert B. ; Bogle, Jamie M. ; Mandrekar, Jay ; Talaber, Alexandra ; Leong, Danielle. / The Effect of In-School Saccadic Training on Reading Fluency and Comprehension in First and Second Grade Students : A Randomized Controlled Trial. In: Journal of Child Neurology. 2017 ; Vol. 32, No. 1. pp. 104-111.
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