The effectiveness of a private orthopaedic practice-based osteoporosis management service to reduce the risk of subsequent fractures

Debra L. Sietsema, Andre B. Araujo, Li Wang, Natalie N. Boytsov, Shivani A. Pandya, Virginia S. Haynes, Douglas E. Faries, Kathleen A. Taylor, Onur Baser, Clifford B. Jones

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Osteoporosis is prevalent in the United States, with an increasing need for management. In this study, we evaluated the effectiveness of a private orthopaedic practice-based osteoporosis management service (OP MS) in reducing subsequent fracture risk and improving other aspects of osteoporosis management of patients who had sustained fractures. Methods: This was a retrospective cohort study using the 100% Medicare data set for Michigan residents with any vertebral; hip, pelvic or femoral; or other nonvertebral fracture during the period of April 1, 2010 to September 30, 2014. Patients who received OP MS care with a follow-up visit within 90 days of the first fracture, and those who did not seek OP MS care but had a physician visit within 90 days of the first fracture, were considered as exposed and unexposed, respectively (first follow-up visit = index date). Eligible patients with continuous enrollment in Medicare Parts A and B for the 90-day pre-index period were followed until the earliest of death, health-plan disenrollment, or study end (December 31, 2014) to evaluate rates of subsequent fracture, osteoporosis medication prescriptions filled, and bone mineral density (BMD) assessments. Health-care costs were evaluated among patients with 12 months of post-index continuous enrollment. Propensity-score matching was used to balance differences in baseline characteristics. Each exposed patient was matched to an unexposed patient within ± 0.01 units of the propensity score. After propensity-score matching, Cox regression examined the hazard ratio (HR) of clinical and economic outcomes in the exposed and unexposed cohorts. Results: Two well-matched cohorts of 1,304 patients each were produced. The exposed cohort had a longer median time to subsequent fracture (998 compared with 743 days; log-rank p = 0.001), a lower risk of subsequent fracture (HR = 0.8; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.7 to 0.9), and a higher likelihood of having osteoporosis medication prescriptions filled (HR = 1.7; 95% CI = 1.4 to 2.0) and BMD assessments (HR = 4.3; 95% CI = 3.7 to 5.0). The total 12-month costs ($25,306 compared with $22,896 [USD]; p = 0.082) did not differ significantly between the cohorts. Conclusions: A private orthopaedic practice-based OP MS effectively reduced subsequent fracture risk, likely through coordinated and ongoing comprehensive patient care, without a significant overall higher cost.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1819-1828
Number of pages10
JournalJournal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume
Volume100
Issue number21
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2018
Externally publishedYes

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Orthopedics and Sports Medicine

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    Sietsema, D. L., Araujo, A. B., Wang, L., Boytsov, N. N., Pandya, S. A., Haynes, V. S., Faries, D. E., Taylor, K. A., Baser, O., & Jones, C. B. (2018). The effectiveness of a private orthopaedic practice-based osteoporosis management service to reduce the risk of subsequent fractures. Journal of Bone and Joint Surgery - American Volume, 100(21), 1819-1828. https://doi.org/10.2106/JBJS.17.01388