The effects of post-traumatic depression on cognition, pain, fatigue, and headache after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: a thematic review

R. G. Kumar, S. Gao, S. B. Juengst, A. K. Wagner, A. Fabio

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Post-traumatic depression (PTD) is one of the most common secondary complications to develop after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it rarely manifests singularly, and often co-occurs with other common TBI impairments. Objective: The objective of this thematic review is to evaluate studies examining the relationships between PTD and cognition, fatigue, pain, and headache among individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI. Results: We reviewed 16 studies examining the relationship between PTD and cognition (five articles), fatigue (five articles), pain (four articles), and headache (two articles). Two studies failed to identify the significant associations between PTD and neuropsychological test performance, while one study found a positive association. Two other studies found that early PTD was associated with later executive dysfunction. Studies on fatigue suggest it is a cause, not consequence, of PTD. Individuals with PTD tended to report more pain than those without PTD. Studies examining relationships between PTD and post-traumatic headache were equivocal. Conclusions: Studies evaluating the effects of PTD on common TBI impairments have yielded mixed results. Evidence suggests PTD precedes the development of executive dysfunction, and a strong link exists between fatigue and PTD, with fatigue preceding PTD. Future prospective studies evaluating PTD relationships to pain and headache are warranted to elucidate causality.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)383-394
Number of pages12
JournalBrain Injury
Volume32
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 21 2018

Fingerprint

Cognition
Fatigue
Headache
Depression
Pain
Traumatic Brain Injury
Thematic
Post-Traumatic Headache
Neuropsychological Tests
Causality
Prospective Studies

Keywords

  • cognitive impairment
  • depression
  • executive dysfunction
  • fatigue
  • headache
  • pain
  • Traumatic brain injury

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience (miscellaneous)
  • Developmental and Educational Psychology
  • Arts and Humanities (miscellaneous)
  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The effects of post-traumatic depression on cognition, pain, fatigue, and headache after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury : a thematic review. / Kumar, R. G.; Gao, S.; Juengst, S. B.; Wagner, A. K.; Fabio, A.

In: Brain Injury, Vol. 32, No. 4, 21.03.2018, p. 383-394.

Research output: Contribution to journalReview article

@article{5eef7948fa07496b8436d3f38c94965c,
title = "The effects of post-traumatic depression on cognition, pain, fatigue, and headache after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury: a thematic review",
abstract = "Background: Post-traumatic depression (PTD) is one of the most common secondary complications to develop after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it rarely manifests singularly, and often co-occurs with other common TBI impairments. Objective: The objective of this thematic review is to evaluate studies examining the relationships between PTD and cognition, fatigue, pain, and headache among individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI. Results: We reviewed 16 studies examining the relationship between PTD and cognition (five articles), fatigue (five articles), pain (four articles), and headache (two articles). Two studies failed to identify the significant associations between PTD and neuropsychological test performance, while one study found a positive association. Two other studies found that early PTD was associated with later executive dysfunction. Studies on fatigue suggest it is a cause, not consequence, of PTD. Individuals with PTD tended to report more pain than those without PTD. Studies examining relationships between PTD and post-traumatic headache were equivocal. Conclusions: Studies evaluating the effects of PTD on common TBI impairments have yielded mixed results. Evidence suggests PTD precedes the development of executive dysfunction, and a strong link exists between fatigue and PTD, with fatigue preceding PTD. Future prospective studies evaluating PTD relationships to pain and headache are warranted to elucidate causality.",
keywords = "cognitive impairment, depression, executive dysfunction, fatigue, headache, pain, Traumatic brain injury",
author = "Kumar, {R. G.} and S. Gao and Juengst, {S. B.} and Wagner, {A. K.} and A. Fabio",
year = "2018",
month = "3",
day = "21",
doi = "10.1080/02699052.2018.1427888",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "32",
pages = "383--394",
journal = "Brain Injury",
issn = "0269-9052",
publisher = "Informa Healthcare",
number = "4",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effects of post-traumatic depression on cognition, pain, fatigue, and headache after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury

T2 - a thematic review

AU - Kumar, R. G.

AU - Gao, S.

AU - Juengst, S. B.

AU - Wagner, A. K.

AU - Fabio, A.

PY - 2018/3/21

Y1 - 2018/3/21

N2 - Background: Post-traumatic depression (PTD) is one of the most common secondary complications to develop after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it rarely manifests singularly, and often co-occurs with other common TBI impairments. Objective: The objective of this thematic review is to evaluate studies examining the relationships between PTD and cognition, fatigue, pain, and headache among individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI. Results: We reviewed 16 studies examining the relationship between PTD and cognition (five articles), fatigue (five articles), pain (four articles), and headache (two articles). Two studies failed to identify the significant associations between PTD and neuropsychological test performance, while one study found a positive association. Two other studies found that early PTD was associated with later executive dysfunction. Studies on fatigue suggest it is a cause, not consequence, of PTD. Individuals with PTD tended to report more pain than those without PTD. Studies examining relationships between PTD and post-traumatic headache were equivocal. Conclusions: Studies evaluating the effects of PTD on common TBI impairments have yielded mixed results. Evidence suggests PTD precedes the development of executive dysfunction, and a strong link exists between fatigue and PTD, with fatigue preceding PTD. Future prospective studies evaluating PTD relationships to pain and headache are warranted to elucidate causality.

AB - Background: Post-traumatic depression (PTD) is one of the most common secondary complications to develop after moderate-to-severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). However, it rarely manifests singularly, and often co-occurs with other common TBI impairments. Objective: The objective of this thematic review is to evaluate studies examining the relationships between PTD and cognition, fatigue, pain, and headache among individuals with moderate-to-severe TBI. Results: We reviewed 16 studies examining the relationship between PTD and cognition (five articles), fatigue (five articles), pain (four articles), and headache (two articles). Two studies failed to identify the significant associations between PTD and neuropsychological test performance, while one study found a positive association. Two other studies found that early PTD was associated with later executive dysfunction. Studies on fatigue suggest it is a cause, not consequence, of PTD. Individuals with PTD tended to report more pain than those without PTD. Studies examining relationships between PTD and post-traumatic headache were equivocal. Conclusions: Studies evaluating the effects of PTD on common TBI impairments have yielded mixed results. Evidence suggests PTD precedes the development of executive dysfunction, and a strong link exists between fatigue and PTD, with fatigue preceding PTD. Future prospective studies evaluating PTD relationships to pain and headache are warranted to elucidate causality.

KW - cognitive impairment

KW - depression

KW - executive dysfunction

KW - fatigue

KW - headache

KW - pain

KW - Traumatic brain injury

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85041921821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=85041921821&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1080/02699052.2018.1427888

DO - 10.1080/02699052.2018.1427888

M3 - Review article

C2 - 29355429

AN - SCOPUS:85041921821

VL - 32

SP - 383

EP - 394

JO - Brain Injury

JF - Brain Injury

SN - 0269-9052

IS - 4

ER -