The effects of sevelamer and calcium acetate on proxies of atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic vascular disease in hemodialysis patients

Glenn M. Chertow, Paolo Raggi, James T. McCarthy, Gerald Schulman, Jeffrey Silberzweig, Amy Kuhlik, William G. Goodman, Amy Boulay, Steven K. Burke, Robert D. Toto

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

91 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: We recently determined that in hemodialysis patients, the use of calcium salts to correct hyperphosphatemia led to progressive coronary artery and aortic calcification as determined by sequential electron beam tomography (EBT) while the use of the non-calcium-containing binder sevelamer did not. Whether the specific calcium preparation (acetate vs. carbonate) might influence the likelihood of progressive calcification was debated. Methods: To determine whether treatment with calcium acetate was specifically associated with hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification, we conducted an analysis restricted to 108 hemodialysis patients randomized to calcium acetate or sevelamer and followed for one year. Results: The reduction in serum phosphorus was roughly equivalent with both agents (calcium acetate -2.5 ± 1.8 mg/dl vs. sevelamer -2.8 ± 2.0 mg/dl, p = 0.53). Subjects given calcium acetate were more likely to develop hypercalcemia (defined as an albumin-corrected serum calcium ≥ 10.5 mg/dl) (36 vs. 13%, p = 0.015). Treatment with calcium acetate (mean 4.6 ± 2.1 g/day - equivalent to 1.2 ± 0.5 g of elemental calcium) led to a significant increase in EBT-determined calcification of the coronary arteries (mean change 182 ± 350, median change +20, p = 0.002) and aorta (mean change 181 ± 855, median change +73, p < 0.0001). These changes were similar in magnitude to those seen with calcium carbonate. There were no significant changes in calcification among sevelamer-treated subjects. Conclusion: Despite purported differences in safety and efficacy relative to calcium carbonate, calcium acetate led to hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)307-314
Number of pages8
JournalAmerican Journal of Nephrology
Volume23
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - 2003

Fingerprint

calcium acetate
Proxy
Vascular Diseases
Renal Dialysis
Hypercalcemia
Vascular Calcification
X Ray Computed Tomography
Calcium Carbonate
Calcium
Coronary Vessels
Hyperphosphatemia
Carbonates
Sevelamer
Serum Albumin
Phosphorus
Aorta

Keywords

  • Arteriosclerosis
  • Calcification
  • Calcium
  • Clinical trial
  • Sevelamer

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Nephrology

Cite this

The effects of sevelamer and calcium acetate on proxies of atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic vascular disease in hemodialysis patients. / Chertow, Glenn M.; Raggi, Paolo; McCarthy, James T.; Schulman, Gerald; Silberzweig, Jeffrey; Kuhlik, Amy; Goodman, William G.; Boulay, Amy; Burke, Steven K.; Toto, Robert D.

In: American Journal of Nephrology, Vol. 23, No. 5, 2003, p. 307-314.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Chertow, GM, Raggi, P, McCarthy, JT, Schulman, G, Silberzweig, J, Kuhlik, A, Goodman, WG, Boulay, A, Burke, SK & Toto, RD 2003, 'The effects of sevelamer and calcium acetate on proxies of atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic vascular disease in hemodialysis patients', American Journal of Nephrology, vol. 23, no. 5, pp. 307-314. https://doi.org/10.1159/000072822
Chertow, Glenn M. ; Raggi, Paolo ; McCarthy, James T. ; Schulman, Gerald ; Silberzweig, Jeffrey ; Kuhlik, Amy ; Goodman, William G. ; Boulay, Amy ; Burke, Steven K. ; Toto, Robert D. / The effects of sevelamer and calcium acetate on proxies of atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic vascular disease in hemodialysis patients. In: American Journal of Nephrology. 2003 ; Vol. 23, No. 5. pp. 307-314.
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T1 - The effects of sevelamer and calcium acetate on proxies of atherosclerotic and arteriosclerotic vascular disease in hemodialysis patients

AU - Chertow, Glenn M.

AU - Raggi, Paolo

AU - McCarthy, James T.

AU - Schulman, Gerald

AU - Silberzweig, Jeffrey

AU - Kuhlik, Amy

AU - Goodman, William G.

AU - Boulay, Amy

AU - Burke, Steven K.

AU - Toto, Robert D.

PY - 2003

Y1 - 2003

N2 - Background: We recently determined that in hemodialysis patients, the use of calcium salts to correct hyperphosphatemia led to progressive coronary artery and aortic calcification as determined by sequential electron beam tomography (EBT) while the use of the non-calcium-containing binder sevelamer did not. Whether the specific calcium preparation (acetate vs. carbonate) might influence the likelihood of progressive calcification was debated. Methods: To determine whether treatment with calcium acetate was specifically associated with hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification, we conducted an analysis restricted to 108 hemodialysis patients randomized to calcium acetate or sevelamer and followed for one year. Results: The reduction in serum phosphorus was roughly equivalent with both agents (calcium acetate -2.5 ± 1.8 mg/dl vs. sevelamer -2.8 ± 2.0 mg/dl, p = 0.53). Subjects given calcium acetate were more likely to develop hypercalcemia (defined as an albumin-corrected serum calcium ≥ 10.5 mg/dl) (36 vs. 13%, p = 0.015). Treatment with calcium acetate (mean 4.6 ± 2.1 g/day - equivalent to 1.2 ± 0.5 g of elemental calcium) led to a significant increase in EBT-determined calcification of the coronary arteries (mean change 182 ± 350, median change +20, p = 0.002) and aorta (mean change 181 ± 855, median change +73, p < 0.0001). These changes were similar in magnitude to those seen with calcium carbonate. There were no significant changes in calcification among sevelamer-treated subjects. Conclusion: Despite purported differences in safety and efficacy relative to calcium carbonate, calcium acetate led to hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients.

AB - Background: We recently determined that in hemodialysis patients, the use of calcium salts to correct hyperphosphatemia led to progressive coronary artery and aortic calcification as determined by sequential electron beam tomography (EBT) while the use of the non-calcium-containing binder sevelamer did not. Whether the specific calcium preparation (acetate vs. carbonate) might influence the likelihood of progressive calcification was debated. Methods: To determine whether treatment with calcium acetate was specifically associated with hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification, we conducted an analysis restricted to 108 hemodialysis patients randomized to calcium acetate or sevelamer and followed for one year. Results: The reduction in serum phosphorus was roughly equivalent with both agents (calcium acetate -2.5 ± 1.8 mg/dl vs. sevelamer -2.8 ± 2.0 mg/dl, p = 0.53). Subjects given calcium acetate were more likely to develop hypercalcemia (defined as an albumin-corrected serum calcium ≥ 10.5 mg/dl) (36 vs. 13%, p = 0.015). Treatment with calcium acetate (mean 4.6 ± 2.1 g/day - equivalent to 1.2 ± 0.5 g of elemental calcium) led to a significant increase in EBT-determined calcification of the coronary arteries (mean change 182 ± 350, median change +20, p = 0.002) and aorta (mean change 181 ± 855, median change +73, p < 0.0001). These changes were similar in magnitude to those seen with calcium carbonate. There were no significant changes in calcification among sevelamer-treated subjects. Conclusion: Despite purported differences in safety and efficacy relative to calcium carbonate, calcium acetate led to hypercalcemia and progressive vascular calcification in hemodialysis patients.

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KW - Calcification

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KW - Clinical trial

KW - Sevelamer

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