The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson’s disease

Lisa C. Goelz, Fabian J. David, John A. Sweeney, David E. Vaillancourt, Howard Poizner, Leonard Verhagen Metman, Daniel M. Corcos

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Unilateral deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson’s disease improves skeletomotor function assessed clinically, and bilateral STN DBS improves motor function to a significantly greater extent. It is unknown whether unilateral STN DBS improves oculomotor function and whether bilateral STN DBS improves it to a greater extent. Further, it has also been shown that bilateral, but not unilateral, STN DBS is associated with some impaired cognitive-motor functions. The current study compared the effect of unilateral and bilateral STN DBS on sensorimotor and cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Patients performed prosaccade and antisaccade tasks during no stimulation, unilateral stimulation, and bilateral stimulation. There were three sets of findings. First, for the prosaccade task, unilateral STN DBS had no effect on prosaccade latency and it reduced prosaccade gain; bilateral STN DBS reduced prosaccade latency and increased prosaccade gain. Second, for the antisaccade task, neither unilateral nor bilateral stimulation had an effect on antisaccade latency, unilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain, and bilateral STN DBS increased antisaccade gain to a greater extent. Third, bilateral STN DBS induced an increase in prosaccade errors in the antisaccade task. These findings suggest that while bilateral STN DBS benefits spatiotemporal aspects of oculomotor control, it may not be as beneficial for more complex cognitive aspects of oculomotor control. Our findings are discussed considering the strategic role the STN plays in modulating information in the basal ganglia oculomotor circuit.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1-12
Number of pages12
JournalExperimental Brain Research
DOIs
StateAccepted/In press - Nov 14 2016

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Subthalamic Nucleus
Deep Brain Stimulation
Parkinson Disease
Basal Ganglia
Cognition

Keywords

  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Parkinson disease
  • Saccade
  • STN DBS
  • Subthalamic nucleus

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

Goelz, L. C., David, F. J., Sweeney, J. A., Vaillancourt, D. E., Poizner, H., Metman, L. V., & Corcos, D. M. (Accepted/In press). The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson’s disease. Experimental Brain Research, 1-12. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00221-016-4830-2

The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson’s disease. / Goelz, Lisa C.; David, Fabian J.; Sweeney, John A.; Vaillancourt, David E.; Poizner, Howard; Metman, Leonard Verhagen; Corcos, Daniel M.

In: Experimental Brain Research, 14.11.2016, p. 1-12.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Goelz, Lisa C. ; David, Fabian J. ; Sweeney, John A. ; Vaillancourt, David E. ; Poizner, Howard ; Metman, Leonard Verhagen ; Corcos, Daniel M. / The effects of unilateral versus bilateral subthalamic nucleus deep brain stimulation on prosaccades and antisaccades in Parkinson’s disease. In: Experimental Brain Research. 2016 ; pp. 1-12.
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