The endocrine control of male phenotypic development.

J. D. Wilson, Jim Griffin III, F. W. George, M. Leshin

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male and female embryos develop in an identical fashion during the initial portion of gestation. If the indifferent gonad differentiates into an ovary (or if no gonad is present), a female phenotype is formed. Male phenotypic differentiation, however, requires the presence of an endocrinologically active testis. Two secretions of the foetal testis, Mullerian-inhibiting substance and testosterone, are responsible for male development. Testosterone itself is responsible for virilization of the Wolffian duct system into the epididymis, vas deferens, and seminal vesicle, whereas dihydrotestosterone induces development of the prostate and male external genitalia. Thus, impairment of dihydrotestosterone formation results in a characteristic phenotype consisting of predominantly female external genitalia but normally virilized Wolffian ducts. The molecular mechanisms by which testosterone and dihydrotestosterone act during foetal development appear to involve the same high affinity receptor, a protein that transports both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone to the nucleus of target cells. When this receptor is either absent, deficient, or structurally abnormal, the actions of both testosterone and dihydrotestosterone are impaired, and the resulting developmental anomalies involve both internal and external genital structures.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)101-128
Number of pages28
JournalAustralian Journal of Biological Sciences
Volume36
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1983

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Dihydrotestosterone
testosterone
Testosterone
Wolffian Ducts
Gonads
Testis
gonads
testes
Male Genitalia
Anti-Mullerian Hormone
Female Genitalia
masculinization
Virilism
Phenotype
phenotype
receptors
Vas Deferens
protein transport
seminal vesicles
Seminal Vesicles

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The endocrine control of male phenotypic development. / Wilson, J. D.; Griffin III, Jim; George, F. W.; Leshin, M.

In: Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, Vol. 36, No. 2, 1983, p. 101-128.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, JD, Griffin III, J, George, FW & Leshin, M 1983, 'The endocrine control of male phenotypic development.', Australian Journal of Biological Sciences, vol. 36, no. 2, pp. 101-128.
Wilson, J. D. ; Griffin III, Jim ; George, F. W. ; Leshin, M. / The endocrine control of male phenotypic development. In: Australian Journal of Biological Sciences. 1983 ; Vol. 36, No. 2. pp. 101-128.
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