The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap: Vascular anatomy and clinical applications

Shannon Colohan, Corrine Wong, Chrisovalantis Lakhiani, Angela Cheng, Munique Maia, Gary Arbique, Michel Saint-Cyr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

24 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Increasing focus on reducing morbidity from latissimus dorsi flaps has led to the evolution of muscle-sparing variants and perforator-based flaps. This study aimed to investigate the vascular anatomy of the muscle-sparing variant and to describe its application as a free flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Methods: Twelve fresh cadavers underwent anatomical dissection and angiographic injection studies of the thoracodorsal arterial system. The musculocutaneous territories of the descending and transverse branches to the latissimus dorsi muscle were identified and assessed using three-dimensional reconstruction software of computed tomography imaging results. In the clinical study, five patients underwent reconstruction of a variety of defects using the free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Results: Three-and four-dimensional (computed tomography) angiography demonstrated perfusion of the latissimus dorsi muscle by the transverse and descending branches, with overlap of vascular territories via cross-linking vessels. The descending branch supplied a slightly greater cutaneous area overlying the muscle, although differences between both branches were not significant (p = 0.76). In the clinical study, the free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap provided excellent coverage with no flap complications or seroma. Conclusions: The free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery is a viable reconstructive option. Significant collateral flow between vessels allows for larger flap harvest than would be expected. The flap is technically simple to harvest, provides a large perfusion area, and is a reliable variant of the full latissimus dorsi flap. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, V.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume130
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Dec 2012

Fingerprint

Superficial Back Muscles
Blood Vessels
Anatomy
Muscles
Arteries
Perfusion
Four-Dimensional Computed Tomography
Perforator Flap
Seroma
Free Tissue Flaps
Cadaver
Dissection
Software
Tomography
Morbidity
Skin
Injections

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap : Vascular anatomy and clinical applications. / Colohan, Shannon; Wong, Corrine; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis; Cheng, Angela; Maia, Munique; Arbique, Gary; Saint-Cyr, Michel.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 130, No. 6, 12.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Colohan, Shannon ; Wong, Corrine ; Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis ; Cheng, Angela ; Maia, Munique ; Arbique, Gary ; Saint-Cyr, Michel. / The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap : Vascular anatomy and clinical applications. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2012 ; Vol. 130, No. 6.
@article{b77759decffd4cb6956b4476fec2f357,
title = "The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap: Vascular anatomy and clinical applications",
abstract = "Background: Increasing focus on reducing morbidity from latissimus dorsi flaps has led to the evolution of muscle-sparing variants and perforator-based flaps. This study aimed to investigate the vascular anatomy of the muscle-sparing variant and to describe its application as a free flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Methods: Twelve fresh cadavers underwent anatomical dissection and angiographic injection studies of the thoracodorsal arterial system. The musculocutaneous territories of the descending and transverse branches to the latissimus dorsi muscle were identified and assessed using three-dimensional reconstruction software of computed tomography imaging results. In the clinical study, five patients underwent reconstruction of a variety of defects using the free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Results: Three-and four-dimensional (computed tomography) angiography demonstrated perfusion of the latissimus dorsi muscle by the transverse and descending branches, with overlap of vascular territories via cross-linking vessels. The descending branch supplied a slightly greater cutaneous area overlying the muscle, although differences between both branches were not significant (p = 0.76). In the clinical study, the free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap provided excellent coverage with no flap complications or seroma. Conclusions: The free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery is a viable reconstructive option. Significant collateral flow between vessels allows for larger flap harvest than would be expected. The flap is technically simple to harvest, provides a large perfusion area, and is a reliable variant of the full latissimus dorsi flap. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, V.",
author = "Shannon Colohan and Corrine Wong and Chrisovalantis Lakhiani and Angela Cheng and Munique Maia and Gary Arbique and Michel Saint-Cyr",
year = "2012",
month = "12",
doi = "10.1097/PRS.0b013e31826d9c5e",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "130",
journal = "Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery",
issn = "0032-1052",
publisher = "Lippincott Williams and Wilkins",
number = "6",

}

TY - JOUR

T1 - The free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap

T2 - Vascular anatomy and clinical applications

AU - Colohan, Shannon

AU - Wong, Corrine

AU - Lakhiani, Chrisovalantis

AU - Cheng, Angela

AU - Maia, Munique

AU - Arbique, Gary

AU - Saint-Cyr, Michel

PY - 2012/12

Y1 - 2012/12

N2 - Background: Increasing focus on reducing morbidity from latissimus dorsi flaps has led to the evolution of muscle-sparing variants and perforator-based flaps. This study aimed to investigate the vascular anatomy of the muscle-sparing variant and to describe its application as a free flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Methods: Twelve fresh cadavers underwent anatomical dissection and angiographic injection studies of the thoracodorsal arterial system. The musculocutaneous territories of the descending and transverse branches to the latissimus dorsi muscle were identified and assessed using three-dimensional reconstruction software of computed tomography imaging results. In the clinical study, five patients underwent reconstruction of a variety of defects using the free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Results: Three-and four-dimensional (computed tomography) angiography demonstrated perfusion of the latissimus dorsi muscle by the transverse and descending branches, with overlap of vascular territories via cross-linking vessels. The descending branch supplied a slightly greater cutaneous area overlying the muscle, although differences between both branches were not significant (p = 0.76). In the clinical study, the free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap provided excellent coverage with no flap complications or seroma. Conclusions: The free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery is a viable reconstructive option. Significant collateral flow between vessels allows for larger flap harvest than would be expected. The flap is technically simple to harvest, provides a large perfusion area, and is a reliable variant of the full latissimus dorsi flap. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, V.

AB - Background: Increasing focus on reducing morbidity from latissimus dorsi flaps has led to the evolution of muscle-sparing variants and perforator-based flaps. This study aimed to investigate the vascular anatomy of the muscle-sparing variant and to describe its application as a free flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery. Methods: Twelve fresh cadavers underwent anatomical dissection and angiographic injection studies of the thoracodorsal arterial system. The musculocutaneous territories of the descending and transverse branches to the latissimus dorsi muscle were identified and assessed using three-dimensional reconstruction software of computed tomography imaging results. In the clinical study, five patients underwent reconstruction of a variety of defects using the free descending branch muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap. Results: Three-and four-dimensional (computed tomography) angiography demonstrated perfusion of the latissimus dorsi muscle by the transverse and descending branches, with overlap of vascular territories via cross-linking vessels. The descending branch supplied a slightly greater cutaneous area overlying the muscle, although differences between both branches were not significant (p = 0.76). In the clinical study, the free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap provided excellent coverage with no flap complications or seroma. Conclusions: The free muscle-sparing latissimus dorsi flap based on the descending branch of the thoracodorsal artery is a viable reconstructive option. Significant collateral flow between vessels allows for larger flap harvest than would be expected. The flap is technically simple to harvest, provides a large perfusion area, and is a reliable variant of the full latissimus dorsi flap. Clinical Question/Level of Evidence: Therapeutic, V.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84870871587&partnerID=8YFLogxK

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/citedby.url?scp=84870871587&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e31826d9c5e

DO - 10.1097/PRS.0b013e31826d9c5e

M3 - Article

C2 - 23190829

AN - SCOPUS:84870871587

VL - 130

JO - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

JF - Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery

SN - 0032-1052

IS - 6

ER -