The future of basic science in academic surgery

Sundeep G. Keswani, Chad M. Moles, Michael Morowitz, Herbert Zeh, John S. Kuo, Matthew H. Levine, Lily S. Cheng, David J. Hackam, Nita Ahuja, Allan M. Goldstein

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

36 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: The aim of this study was to examine the challenges confronting surgeons performing basic science research in today's academic surgery environment. Summary of Background Data: Multiple studies have identified challenges confronting surgeon-scientists and impacting their ability to be successful. Although these threats have been known for decades, the downward trend in the number of successful surgeon-scientists continues. Clinical demands, funding challenges, and other factors play important roles, but a rigorous analysis of academic surgeons and their experiences regarding these issues has not previously been performed. Methods: An online survey was distributed to 2504 members of the Association for Academic Surgery and Society of University Surgeons to determine factors impacting success. Survey results were subjected to statistical analyses. We also reviewed publicly available data regarding funding from the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: NIH data revealed a 27% decline in the proportion of NIH funding to surgical departments relative to total NIH funding from 2007 to 2014. A total of 1033 (41%) members responded to our survey, making this the largest survey of academic surgeons to date. Surgeons most often cited the following factors as major impediments to pursuing basic investigation: pressure to be clinically productive, excessive administrative responsibilities, difficulty obtaining extramural funding, and desire for work-life balance. Surprisingly, a majority (68%) did not believe surgeons can be successful basic scientists in today's environment, including departmental leadership. Conclusions: We have identified important barriers that confront academic surgeons pursuing basic research and a perception that success in basic science may no longer be achievable. These barriers need to be addressed to ensure the continued development of future surgeon-scientists.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1053-1059
Number of pages7
JournalAnnals of surgery
Volume265
Issue number6
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 1 2017
Externally publishedYes

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Keywords

  • Academic surgery
  • Basic science
  • Surgeon-scientist
  • Translational research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

Keswani, S. G., Moles, C. M., Morowitz, M., Zeh, H., Kuo, J. S., Levine, M. H., Cheng, L. S., Hackam, D. J., Ahuja, N., & Goldstein, A. M. (2017). The future of basic science in academic surgery. Annals of surgery, 265(6), 1053-1059. https://doi.org/10.1097/SLA.0000000000002009