The generation of killer cells to trinitrophenyl modified allogeneic targets by lymphocyte populations negatively selected to strong alloantigens

D. B. Wilson, K. F. Lindahl, D. H. Wilson, J. Sprent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Negatively selected mouse and rat lymphocyte populations, specifically deprived of alloreactivity to a particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype, are nevertheless fully capable of responding to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified allogeneic stimulator cells and developing cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity to TNP-altered allogeneic target cells. As for syngeneic systems, lytic expression of those responder killer cells also requires MHC identity between the target and stimulator cell populations. Such a finding argues strongly against two variations of the dual recognition hypothesis: like-like interactions and adaptive differentiation. Instead, these data favor either the altered self model or a third variation of the dual receptor model, where one of the relevant receptors is specific for the modifying antigen and the second is a low affinity receptor unable to be triggered in the absence of a modifying antigen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-367
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume146
Issue number2
StatePublished - 1977

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Isoantigens
Health Services Needs and Demand
Lymphocytes
Major Histocompatibility Complex
Antigens
Cytotoxic T-Lymphocytes
Haplotypes
Population

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology

Cite this

The generation of killer cells to trinitrophenyl modified allogeneic targets by lymphocyte populations negatively selected to strong alloantigens. / Wilson, D. B.; Lindahl, K. F.; Wilson, D. H.; Sprent, J.

In: Journal of Experimental Medicine, Vol. 146, No. 2, 1977, p. 361-367.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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