The generation of killer cells to trinitrophenyl-modified allogeneic targets by lymphocyte populations negatively selected to strong alloantigens*

D. B. Wilson, K. F. Lindahl, D. H. Wilson, J. Sprent

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

57 Scopus citations

Abstract

Negatively selected mouse and rat lymphocyte populations, specifically deprived of alloreactivity to a particular major histocompatibility complex (MHC) haplotype, are nevertheless fully capable of responding to trinitrophenyl (TNP)-modified allogeneic stimulator cells and developing cytotoxic T-lymphocyte activity to TNP-altered allogeneic target cells. As for syngeneic systems, lytic expression of those responder killer cells also requires MHC identity between the target and stimulator cell populations. Such a finding argues strongly against two variations of the dual recognition hypothesis: like-like interactions and adaptive differentiation. Instead, these data favor either the altered self model or a third variation of the dual receptor model, where one of the relevent receptors is specific for the modifying antigen and the second is a low affinity receptor unable to be triggered in the absence of a modifying antigen.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)361-367
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Experimental Medicine
Volume146
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Aug 1 1977

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy
  • Immunology

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