The hemi-Mustard/bidirectional Glenn atrial switch procedure in the double-switch operation for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries: Rationale and midterm results

Sunil P. Malhotra, V. Mohan Reddy, Mary Qiu, Timothy J. Pirolli, Laura Barboza, Olaf Reinhartz, Frank L. Hanley

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

56 Scopus citations

Abstract

Objective: This study was undertaken to assess the risks and benefits of the double-switch operation using a hemi-Mustard atrial switch procedure and the bidirectional Glenn operation for congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries. To avoid complications associated with the complete Senning and Mustard procedures and to assist right-heart hemodynamics, we favor a modified atrial switch procedure, consisting of a hemi-Mustard procedure to baffle inferior vena caval return to the tricuspid valve in conjunction with a bidirectional Glenn operation. Methods: Between January 1994 and September 2009, anatomic repair was achieved in 48 patients. The Rastelli-atrial switch procedure was performed in 25 patients with pulmonary atresia and the arterial-atrial switch procedure was performed in 23 patients. A hemi-Mustard procedure was the atrial switch procedure for 70% (33/48) of anatomic repairs. Results: There was 1 in-hospital death after anatomic repair. There were no late deaths or transplantation. At a median follow-up of 59.2 months, 43 of 47 survivors are in New York Heart Association class I. Bidirectional Glenn operation complications were uncommon (2/33), limited to the perioperative period, and seen in patients less than 4 months of age. Atrial baffle-related reoperations or sinus node dysfunction have not been observed. Tricuspid regurgitation decreased from a mean grade of 2.3 to 1.2 after repair (P = .00002). Right ventricle-pulmonary artery conduit longevity is significantly improved. Conclusions: We describe a 15-year experience with the double-switch operation using a modified atrial switch procedure with favorable midterm results. The risks of the hemi-mustard and bidirectional Glenn operation are minimal and are limited to a well-defined patient subset. The benefits include prolonged conduit life, reduced baffle- and sinus node-related complications, and technical simplicity.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-170
Number of pages9
JournalJournal of Thoracic and Cardiovascular Surgery
Volume141
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 1 2011

Keywords

  • AAS
  • BDG
  • NYHA
  • New York Heart Association
  • PA
  • PAB
  • RAS
  • RV
  • Rastelli-atrial switch
  • TR
  • VSD
  • arterial-atrial switch
  • bidirectional Glenn
  • ccTGA
  • congenitally corrected transposition of the great arteries
  • pulmonary artery
  • pulmonary artery banding
  • right ventricle
  • tricuspid regurgitation
  • ventricular septal defect

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery
  • Pulmonary and Respiratory Medicine
  • Cardiology and Cardiovascular Medicine

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