The hormonal control of sexual development

Jean D. Wilson, Fredrick W. George, Jim Griffin III

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

295 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Male and female human embryos develop identically during the first phase of gestation. The indifferent gonads then differentiate into ovaries or testes and soon begin to secrete their characteristic hormones. If ovaries (or no gonads) are present the final phenotype is female; thus no gonadal hormones are required for female development during embryogenesis. Two hormones of the fetal testis - Müllerian regression hormone and testosterone-are responsible for the formation of the male phenotype. Analysis of fibroblasts from the skin of patients with abnormalities of sexual development due to single gene defects shows that testosterone is responsible for virilization of the male internal genital tract, that its derivative dihydrotestosterone causes development of the male external genitalia, and that both hormones act in the embryo by the same receptor mechanisms operative in postnatal life.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)1278-1284
Number of pages7
JournalScience
Volume211
Issue number4488
StatePublished - 1981

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Sexual Development
Hormones
Gonads
Testosterone
Testis
Ovary
Embryonic Structures
Male Genitalia
Virilism
Gonadal Hormones
Phenotype
Inborn Genetic Diseases
Dihydrotestosterone
Embryonic Development
Fibroblasts
Pregnancy
Skin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

Wilson, J. D., George, F. W., & Griffin III, J. (1981). The hormonal control of sexual development. Science, 211(4488), 1278-1284.

The hormonal control of sexual development. / Wilson, Jean D.; George, Fredrick W.; Griffin III, Jim.

In: Science, Vol. 211, No. 4488, 1981, p. 1278-1284.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Wilson, JD, George, FW & Griffin III, J 1981, 'The hormonal control of sexual development', Science, vol. 211, no. 4488, pp. 1278-1284.
Wilson JD, George FW, Griffin III J. The hormonal control of sexual development. Science. 1981;211(4488):1278-1284.
Wilson, Jean D. ; George, Fredrick W. ; Griffin III, Jim. / The hormonal control of sexual development. In: Science. 1981 ; Vol. 211, No. 4488. pp. 1278-1284.
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