The impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation compared with standard negative-pressure wound therapy: A retrospective, historical, cohort, controlled study

Paul J. Kim, Christopher E. Attinger, John S. Steinberg, Karen K. Evans, Kelly A. Powers, Rex W. Hung, Jesse R. Smith, Zinnia M. Rocha, Larry Lavery

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Abstract

Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is a novel wound therapy that combines negative pressure with instillation of a topical solution. Methods: This retrospective, historical, cohort-control study examined the impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with and without instillation. Results: One hundred forty-two patients (negative-pressure wound therapy, n = 74; therapy with instillation, 6-minute dwell time, n = 34; and therapy with instillation, 20-minute dwell time, n = 34) were included in the analysis. Number of operative visits was significantly lower for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (2.4 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.9, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (3.0 ± 0.9) (p ≤ 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter for the 20-minute dwell time group (11.4 ± 5.1 days) compared with the no-instillation group (14.92 ± 9.23 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Time to final surgical procedure was significantly shorter for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (7.8 ± 5.2 and 7.5 ± 3.1 days, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (9.23 ± 5.2 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Percentage of wounds closed before discharge and culture improvement for Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher for the 6-minute dwell time group (94 and 90 percent, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (62 and 63 percent, respectively) (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The authors' results suggest that negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation (6-or 20-minute dwell time) is more beneficial than standard negative-pressure wound therapy for the adjunctive treatment of acutely and chronically infected wounds that require hospital admission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-716
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume133
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

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Negative-Pressure Wound Therapy
Cohort Studies
Historically Controlled Study
Wounds and Injuries
Gram-Positive Bacteria
Length of Stay
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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The impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation compared with standard negative-pressure wound therapy : A retrospective, historical, cohort, controlled study. / Kim, Paul J.; Attinger, Christopher E.; Steinberg, John S.; Evans, Karen K.; Powers, Kelly A.; Hung, Rex W.; Smith, Jesse R.; Rocha, Zinnia M.; Lavery, Larry.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 133, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 709-716.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Kim, Paul J. ; Attinger, Christopher E. ; Steinberg, John S. ; Evans, Karen K. ; Powers, Kelly A. ; Hung, Rex W. ; Smith, Jesse R. ; Rocha, Zinnia M. ; Lavery, Larry. / The impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation compared with standard negative-pressure wound therapy : A retrospective, historical, cohort, controlled study. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2014 ; Vol. 133, No. 3. pp. 709-716.
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abstract = "Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is a novel wound therapy that combines negative pressure with instillation of a topical solution. Methods: This retrospective, historical, cohort-control study examined the impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with and without instillation. Results: One hundred forty-two patients (negative-pressure wound therapy, n = 74; therapy with instillation, 6-minute dwell time, n = 34; and therapy with instillation, 20-minute dwell time, n = 34) were included in the analysis. Number of operative visits was significantly lower for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (2.4 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.9, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (3.0 ± 0.9) (p ≤ 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter for the 20-minute dwell time group (11.4 ± 5.1 days) compared with the no-instillation group (14.92 ± 9.23 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Time to final surgical procedure was significantly shorter for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (7.8 ± 5.2 and 7.5 ± 3.1 days, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (9.23 ± 5.2 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Percentage of wounds closed before discharge and culture improvement for Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher for the 6-minute dwell time group (94 and 90 percent, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (62 and 63 percent, respectively) (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The authors' results suggest that negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation (6-or 20-minute dwell time) is more beneficial than standard negative-pressure wound therapy for the adjunctive treatment of acutely and chronically infected wounds that require hospital admission.",
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T1 - The impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation compared with standard negative-pressure wound therapy

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AU - Kim, Paul J.

AU - Attinger, Christopher E.

AU - Steinberg, John S.

AU - Evans, Karen K.

AU - Powers, Kelly A.

AU - Hung, Rex W.

AU - Smith, Jesse R.

AU - Rocha, Zinnia M.

AU - Lavery, Larry

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N2 - Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is a novel wound therapy that combines negative pressure with instillation of a topical solution. Methods: This retrospective, historical, cohort-control study examined the impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with and without instillation. Results: One hundred forty-two patients (negative-pressure wound therapy, n = 74; therapy with instillation, 6-minute dwell time, n = 34; and therapy with instillation, 20-minute dwell time, n = 34) were included in the analysis. Number of operative visits was significantly lower for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (2.4 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.9, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (3.0 ± 0.9) (p ≤ 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter for the 20-minute dwell time group (11.4 ± 5.1 days) compared with the no-instillation group (14.92 ± 9.23 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Time to final surgical procedure was significantly shorter for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (7.8 ± 5.2 and 7.5 ± 3.1 days, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (9.23 ± 5.2 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Percentage of wounds closed before discharge and culture improvement for Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher for the 6-minute dwell time group (94 and 90 percent, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (62 and 63 percent, respectively) (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The authors' results suggest that negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation (6-or 20-minute dwell time) is more beneficial than standard negative-pressure wound therapy for the adjunctive treatment of acutely and chronically infected wounds that require hospital admission.

AB - Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is a novel wound therapy that combines negative pressure with instillation of a topical solution. Methods: This retrospective, historical, cohort-control study examined the impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with and without instillation. Results: One hundred forty-two patients (negative-pressure wound therapy, n = 74; therapy with instillation, 6-minute dwell time, n = 34; and therapy with instillation, 20-minute dwell time, n = 34) were included in the analysis. Number of operative visits was significantly lower for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (2.4 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.9, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (3.0 ± 0.9) (p ≤ 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter for the 20-minute dwell time group (11.4 ± 5.1 days) compared with the no-instillation group (14.92 ± 9.23 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Time to final surgical procedure was significantly shorter for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (7.8 ± 5.2 and 7.5 ± 3.1 days, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (9.23 ± 5.2 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Percentage of wounds closed before discharge and culture improvement for Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher for the 6-minute dwell time group (94 and 90 percent, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (62 and 63 percent, respectively) (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The authors' results suggest that negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation (6-or 20-minute dwell time) is more beneficial than standard negative-pressure wound therapy for the adjunctive treatment of acutely and chronically infected wounds that require hospital admission.

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