The impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation compared with standard negative-pressure wound therapy: A retrospective, historical, cohort, controlled study

Paul J. Kim, Christopher E. Attinger, John S. Steinberg, Karen K. Evans, Kelly A. Powers, Rex W. Hung, Jesse R. Smith, Zinnia M. Rocha, Larry Lavery

Research output: Contribution to journalArticlepeer-review

81 Scopus citations

Abstract

Background: Negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation is a novel wound therapy that combines negative pressure with instillation of a topical solution. Methods: This retrospective, historical, cohort-control study examined the impact of negative-pressure wound therapy with and without instillation. Results: One hundred forty-two patients (negative-pressure wound therapy, n = 74; therapy with instillation, 6-minute dwell time, n = 34; and therapy with instillation, 20-minute dwell time, n = 34) were included in the analysis. Number of operative visits was significantly lower for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (2.4 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.9, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (3.0 ± 0.9) (p ≤ 0.05). Hospital stay was significantly shorter for the 20-minute dwell time group (11.4 ± 5.1 days) compared with the no-instillation group (14.92 ± 9.23 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Time to final surgical procedure was significantly shorter for the 6-and 20-minute dwell time groups (7.8 ± 5.2 and 7.5 ± 3.1 days, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (9.23 ± 5.2 days) (p ≤ 0.05). Percentage of wounds closed before discharge and culture improvement for Gram-positive bacteria was significantly higher for the 6-minute dwell time group (94 and 90 percent, respectively) compared with the no-instillation group (62 and 63 percent, respectively) (p ≤ 0.05). Conclusion: The authors' results suggest that negative-pressure wound therapy with instillation (6-or 20-minute dwell time) is more beneficial than standard negative-pressure wound therapy for the adjunctive treatment of acutely and chronically infected wounds that require hospital admission.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)709-716
Number of pages8
JournalPlastic and reconstructive surgery
Volume133
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 1 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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