The impact of simulation-based medical education on resident management of emergencies in pediatric anesthesiology

Aditee P Ambardekar, Stephanie Black, Devika Singh, Justin L. Lockman, Allan F. Simpao, Alan J. Schwartz, Roberta L. Hales, David L. Rodgers, Harshad G. Gurnaney

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Resident education in pediatric anesthesiology is challenging. Traditional curricula for anesthesiology residency programs have included a combination of didactic lectures and mentored clinical service, which can be variable. Limited pediatric medical knowledge, technical inexperience, and heightened resident anxiety further challenge patient care. We developed a pediatric anesthesia simulation-based curriculum to address crises related to hypoxemia and dysrhythmia management in the operating room as an adjunct to traditional didactic and clinical experiences. AIMS: The primary objective of this trial was to evaluate the impact of a simulation curriculum designed for anesthesiology residents on their performance during the management of crises in the pediatric operating room. A secondary objective was to compare the retention of learned knowledge by assessment at the eight-week time point during the rotation. METHODS: In this prospective, observational trial 30 residents were randomized to receive simulation-based education on four perioperative crises (Laryngospasm, Bronchospasm, Supraventricular Tachycardia (SVT), and Bradycardia) during the first week (Group A) or fifth week (Group B) of an eight-week rotation. Assessment sessions that included two scenarios (Laryngospasm, SVT) were performed in the first week, fifth week, and the eighth week of their rotation for all residents. The residents were assessed in real time and by video review using a 7-point checklist generated by a modified Delphi technique of senior pediatric anesthesiology faculty. RESULTS: Residents in Group A showed improvement between the first week and fifth week assessment as well as between first week and eighth week assessments without decrement between the fifth week and eighth week assessments for both the laryngospasm and SVT scenarios. Residents in Group B showed improvement between the first week and eighth week assessments for both scenarios and between the fifth week and eighth week assessment for the SVT scenario. CONCLUSION: This adjunctive simulation-based curriculum enhanced the learner's management of laryngospasm and SVT management and is a reasonable addition to didactic and clinical curricula for anesthesiology residents.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)753-759
Number of pages7
JournalPaediatric anaesthesia
Volume29
Issue number7
DOIs
StatePublished - Jul 1 2019

Fingerprint

Supraventricular Tachycardia
Anesthesiology
Laryngismus
Medical Education
Curriculum
Emergencies
Pediatrics
Operating Rooms
Delphi Technique
Education
Bronchial Spasm
Bradycardia
Internship and Residency
Checklist
Patient Care
Anxiety
Anesthesia

Keywords

  • checklist
  • curriculum
  • pediatric anesthesiology
  • perioperative crisis management
  • resident
  • simulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health
  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine

Cite this

The impact of simulation-based medical education on resident management of emergencies in pediatric anesthesiology. / Ambardekar, Aditee P; Black, Stephanie; Singh, Devika; Lockman, Justin L.; Simpao, Allan F.; Schwartz, Alan J.; Hales, Roberta L.; Rodgers, David L.; Gurnaney, Harshad G.

In: Paediatric anaesthesia, Vol. 29, No. 7, 01.07.2019, p. 753-759.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Ambardekar, AP, Black, S, Singh, D, Lockman, JL, Simpao, AF, Schwartz, AJ, Hales, RL, Rodgers, DL & Gurnaney, HG 2019, 'The impact of simulation-based medical education on resident management of emergencies in pediatric anesthesiology', Paediatric anaesthesia, vol. 29, no. 7, pp. 753-759. https://doi.org/10.1111/pan.13652
Ambardekar, Aditee P ; Black, Stephanie ; Singh, Devika ; Lockman, Justin L. ; Simpao, Allan F. ; Schwartz, Alan J. ; Hales, Roberta L. ; Rodgers, David L. ; Gurnaney, Harshad G. / The impact of simulation-based medical education on resident management of emergencies in pediatric anesthesiology. In: Paediatric anaesthesia. 2019 ; Vol. 29, No. 7. pp. 753-759.
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