The impact of youth-friendly structures of care on retention among HIV-infected youth

Lana Lee, Baligh R. Yehia, Aditya H. Gaur, Richard Rutstein, Kelly Gebo, Jeanne C. Keruly, Richard D. Moore, Ank E. Nijhawan, Allison L. Agwu

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Limited data exist on how structures of care impact retention among youth living with HIV (YLHIV). We describe the availability of youth-friendly structures of care within HIV Research Network (HIVRN) clinics and examine their association with retention in HIV care. Data from 680 15- to 24-year-old YLHIV receiving care at 7 adult and 5 pediatric clinics in 2011 were included in the analysis. The primary outcome was retention in care, defined as completing ≥2 primary HIV care visits ≥90 days apart in a 12-month period. Sites were surveyed to assess the availability of clinic structures defined a priori as 'youth-friendly'. Univariate and multivariable logistic regression models assessed structures associated with retention in care. Among 680 YLHIV, 85% were retained. Nearly half (48%) of the 680 YLHIV attended clinics with youth-friendly waiting areas, 36% attended clinics with evening hours, 73% attended clinics with adolescent health-trained providers, 87% could email or text message providers, and 73% could schedule a routine appointment within 2 weeks. Adjusting for demographic and clinical factors, YLHIV were more likely to be retained in care at clinics with a youth-friendly waiting area (AOR 2.47, 95% CI [1.11-5.52]), evening clinic hours (AOR 1.94; 95% CI [1.13-3.33]), and providers with adolescent health training (AOR 1.98; 95% CI [1.01-3.86]). Youth-friendly structures of care impact retention in care among YLHIV. Further investigations are needed to determine how to effectively implement youth-friendly strategies across clinical settings where YLHIV receive care.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)170-177
Number of pages8
JournalAIDS Patient Care and STDs
Volume30
Issue number4
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 1 2016

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HIV
Appointments and Schedules
Logistic Models
Text Messaging
HIV-2
Primary Health Care
Demography
Pediatrics
Research

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

Lee, L., Yehia, B. R., Gaur, A. H., Rutstein, R., Gebo, K., Keruly, J. C., ... Agwu, A. L. (2016). The impact of youth-friendly structures of care on retention among HIV-infected youth. AIDS Patient Care and STDs, 30(4), 170-177. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2015.0263

The impact of youth-friendly structures of care on retention among HIV-infected youth. / Lee, Lana; Yehia, Baligh R.; Gaur, Aditya H.; Rutstein, Richard; Gebo, Kelly; Keruly, Jeanne C.; Moore, Richard D.; Nijhawan, Ank E.; Agwu, Allison L.

In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs, Vol. 30, No. 4, 01.04.2016, p. 170-177.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Lee, L, Yehia, BR, Gaur, AH, Rutstein, R, Gebo, K, Keruly, JC, Moore, RD, Nijhawan, AE & Agwu, AL 2016, 'The impact of youth-friendly structures of care on retention among HIV-infected youth', AIDS Patient Care and STDs, vol. 30, no. 4, pp. 170-177. https://doi.org/10.1089/apc.2015.0263
Lee, Lana ; Yehia, Baligh R. ; Gaur, Aditya H. ; Rutstein, Richard ; Gebo, Kelly ; Keruly, Jeanne C. ; Moore, Richard D. ; Nijhawan, Ank E. ; Agwu, Allison L. / The impact of youth-friendly structures of care on retention among HIV-infected youth. In: AIDS Patient Care and STDs. 2016 ; Vol. 30, No. 4. pp. 170-177.
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