The importance of advanced cardiac life support certification in office-based surgery

Rod J. Rohrich, Thornwell H. Parker, George Broughton, Robert Garza, Danielle Leblanc

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

6 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

BACKGROUND: Safety in office-based surgery remains of paramount importance. Accordingly, many consider Advanced Cardiac Life Support training a critical component of safety preparation for office-based surgery. A survey was recently designed and distributed to assess the experience and attitudes of board-certified plastic surgeons toward Advanced Cardiac Life Support training. METHODS: A two-page, 14-question survey was mailed to the 4581 members of the American Society of Plastic Surgeons. The anonymous survey consisted of multiple choice questions eliciting status of Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification, use of office-based surgery, experience with adverse cardiac and respiratory events, and opinions on mandating Advanced Cardiac Life Support training. RESULTS: The total number of surveys returned was 1461 (32 percent). Current Basic Life Support and Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification was 65.6 percent and 44.9 percent, respectively. Over the past 10 years, 29 percent of plastic surgeons participated in a cardiac or respiratory arrest, and 43.9 percent of these surgeons acted as the code leader; 60.2 percent of plastic surgeons felt Advanced Cardiac Life Support certification should be required, but only 26 percent of these felt it should be mandated to maintain board certification. CONCLUSIONS: Historically, Advanced Cardiac Life Support and facility accreditation were strongly recommended but often not required for office-based surgery. The American Society of Plastic Surgeons and the American Society for Aesthetic Plastic Surgery have taken steps to increase patient safety, mandating that outpatient plastic surgery only be performed at accredited facilities. Many credentialing organizations are now escalating the requirements for Advanced Cardiac Life Support/Basic Life Support certification.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume121
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2008

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Advanced Cardiac Life Support
Certification
Ambulatory Surgical Procedures
Plastic Surgery
Credentialing
Safety
Accreditation
Patient Safety
Surgeons
Organizations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

Cite this

The importance of advanced cardiac life support certification in office-based surgery. / Rohrich, Rod J.; Parker, Thornwell H.; Broughton, George; Garza, Robert; Leblanc, Danielle.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 121, No. 3, 03.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Rohrich, Rod J. ; Parker, Thornwell H. ; Broughton, George ; Garza, Robert ; Leblanc, Danielle. / The importance of advanced cardiac life support certification in office-based surgery. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2008 ; Vol. 121, No. 3.
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