The Influence of Shc Proteins and Aging on Whole Body Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Mice

Jennifer H. Stern, Kyoungmi Kim, Jon J. Ramsey

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

While it has been proposed that Shc family of adaptor proteins may influence aging by regulating insulin signaling and energy metabolism, the overall impact of Shc proteins on whole body energy metabolism has yet to be elucidated. Thus, the purpose of this study was to determine the influence of Shc proteins and aging on whole body energy metabolism in a mouse model under ambient conditions (22°C) and acute cold exposure (12°C for 24 hours). Using indirect respiration calorimetry, we investigated the impact of Shc proteins and aging on EE and substrate utilization (RQ) in p66 Shc-/- (ShcKO) and wild-type (WT) mice. Calorimetry measurements were completed in 3, 15, and 27 mo mice at 22°C and 12°C. At both temperatures and when analyzed across all age groups, ShcKO mice demonstrated lower 24 h total EE values than that of WT mice when EE data was expressed as either kJ per mouse, or adjusted by body weight or crude organ mass (ORGAN) (P≤0.01 for all). The ShcKO mice also had higher (P<0.05) fed state RQ values than WT animals at 22°C, consistent with an increase in glucose utilization. However, Shc proteins did not influence age-related changes in energy expenditure or RQ. Age had a significant impact on EE at 22°C, regardless of how EE data was expressed (P<0.05), demonstrating a pattern of increase in EE from age 3 to 15 mo, followed by a decrease in EE at 27 mo. These results indicate a decline in whole body EE with advanced age in mice, independent of changes in body weight (BW) or fat free mass (FFM). The results of this study indicate that both Shc proteins and aging should be considered as factors that influence energy expenditure in mice.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article numbere48790
JournalPLoS One
Volume7
Issue number11
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 7 2012

Fingerprint

energy expenditure
Energy Metabolism
Aging of materials
mice
Substrates
Proteins
proteins
Calorimetry
energy metabolism
Indirect Calorimetry
calorimetry
Shc Signaling Adaptor Proteins
Animals
Wild Animals
Fats
Insulin
body fat
breathing
Glucose
insulin

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Biochemistry, Genetics and Molecular Biology(all)
  • Agricultural and Biological Sciences(all)

Cite this

The Influence of Shc Proteins and Aging on Whole Body Energy Expenditure and Substrate Utilization in Mice. / Stern, Jennifer H.; Kim, Kyoungmi; Ramsey, Jon J.

In: PLoS One, Vol. 7, No. 11, e48790, 07.11.2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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