The Interdisciplinary Academy for Coaching and Teamwork (I-ACT)

A novel approach for training faculty experts in preventing healthcare-associated infection

Wendy Nickel, Sanjay Saint, Russell N. Olmsted, Eugene Chu, Linda Greene, Barbara S. Edson, Scott A. Flanders

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

2 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background The Interdisciplinary Academy for Coaching and Teamwork (I-ACT) was an advanced course aimed at educating leaders of a quality improvement project on addressing clinical challenges associated with catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI), overcoming socioadaptive issues among a multidisciplinary team, and effective coaching. Methods The I-ACT course provided substantial opportunities for interaction among participants and faculty experts through role playing. Participants were grouped so that each discipline of a potential CAUTI improvement team was represented during interactive components of the training. Precourse and postcourse surveys were used to assess participants' comfort in addressing various challenges associated with implementation of interventions. Results After the course, participants expressed improved comfort with using the tools provided to address challenging socioadaptive issues. Written comments indicated that the participants valued being able to learn from experts and meet in a face-to-face setting. Conclusions The I-ACT course was successful in training faculty to serve as improvement experts for US hospitals working on CAUTI prevention. After completing the course, participants felt that their comfort and ability to address complex improvement problems had improved. This model may be effective for use in preparing improvement project leaders and participants to tackle other healthcare-associated infections and complex quality problems.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)S230-S235
JournalAmerican Journal of Infection Control
Volume42
Issue number10
DOIs
StatePublished - Oct 1 2014

Fingerprint

Cross Infection
Catheter-Related Infections
Urinary Tract Infections
Role Playing
Aptitude
Quality Improvement
Mentoring

Keywords

  • Catheter-associated infection
  • Mentors
  • Quality improvement
  • Socioadaptive
  • Urinary catheterization

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Epidemiology
  • Health Policy
  • Public Health, Environmental and Occupational Health
  • Infectious Diseases

Cite this

The Interdisciplinary Academy for Coaching and Teamwork (I-ACT) : A novel approach for training faculty experts in preventing healthcare-associated infection. / Nickel, Wendy; Saint, Sanjay; Olmsted, Russell N.; Chu, Eugene; Greene, Linda; Edson, Barbara S.; Flanders, Scott A.

In: American Journal of Infection Control, Vol. 42, No. 10, 01.10.2014, p. S230-S235.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Nickel, Wendy ; Saint, Sanjay ; Olmsted, Russell N. ; Chu, Eugene ; Greene, Linda ; Edson, Barbara S. ; Flanders, Scott A. / The Interdisciplinary Academy for Coaching and Teamwork (I-ACT) : A novel approach for training faculty experts in preventing healthcare-associated infection. In: American Journal of Infection Control. 2014 ; Vol. 42, No. 10. pp. S230-S235.
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