The low transverse extended latissimus dorsi flap based on fat compartments of the back for breast reconstruction: Anatomical study and clinical results

Steven H. Bailey, Michel Saint-Cyr, Georgette Oni, Corrine Wong, Munique Maia, Viet Nguyen, Joel E. Pessa, Shannon Colohan, Rod J. Rohrich, Ali Mojallal

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

9 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite many modifications to the extended latissimus dorsi flap, its use in autologous breast reconstruction remains limited because of insufficient volume and donor-site morbidity. Through a detailed analysis of the deposition of back fat, this study describes a low transverse extended latissimus dorsi flap harvest technique that increases flap volumes and improves donor-site aesthetics. MethodS: Eight fresh cadaver hemibacks were used to identify the anatomical location of the fat compartments. Correlation between the fat compartments and the fat folds was made using photographic analysis of 216 patients. Retrospective case note review was conducted of all patients who had a low transverse extended latissimus dorsi flap performed by the senior author (M.S.-C.). Results: Cadaveric dissection and photographic analysis confirmed the presence of the four distinct fat compartments in the back. The lower compartments 3 and 4 were the most frequently identified and the largest, with mean values of 367 cm and 271 cm, respectively. The clinical series comprised eight high-body mass index patients who underwent 12 pure autologous breast reconstructions using the low transverse skin paddle harvest technique. Donor-site complications included partial dehiscence (n = 2) and minor infection (n = 3). There were no instances of seroma, and fat necrosis (<5 percent) occurred in one breast. Conclusions: The low transverse skin paddle extended latissimus dorsi flap is reliable and provides sufficient volume for purely autologous breast reconstruction with low donor-site morbidity and improved body contouring for a select group of patients. The authors' initial experience with high-body mass index patients shows promising results with this flap in a challenging group.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalPlastic and Reconstructive Surgery
Volume128
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - Nov 2011

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Superficial Back Muscles
Mammaplasty
Fats
Tissue Donors
Body Mass Index
Fat Necrosis
Morbidity
Seroma
Skin
Esthetics
Cadaver
Dissection
Breast
Clinical Studies
Infection

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Surgery

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The low transverse extended latissimus dorsi flap based on fat compartments of the back for breast reconstruction : Anatomical study and clinical results. / Bailey, Steven H.; Saint-Cyr, Michel; Oni, Georgette; Wong, Corrine; Maia, Munique; Nguyen, Viet; Pessa, Joel E.; Colohan, Shannon; Rohrich, Rod J.; Mojallal, Ali.

In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery, Vol. 128, No. 5, 11.2011.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Bailey, Steven H. ; Saint-Cyr, Michel ; Oni, Georgette ; Wong, Corrine ; Maia, Munique ; Nguyen, Viet ; Pessa, Joel E. ; Colohan, Shannon ; Rohrich, Rod J. ; Mojallal, Ali. / The low transverse extended latissimus dorsi flap based on fat compartments of the back for breast reconstruction : Anatomical study and clinical results. In: Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery. 2011 ; Vol. 128, No. 5.
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AU - Maia, Munique

AU - Nguyen, Viet

AU - Pessa, Joel E.

AU - Colohan, Shannon

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