The mechanism of action of glatiramer acetate treatment in multiple sclerosis

Michael K. Racke, Amy E. Lovett-Racke, Nitin J. Karandikar

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

84 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Objective: Glatiramer acetate (formerly known as copolymer 1) is the major noninterferon immunomodulatory agent used in the treatment of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis. Its mechanism of action over the past 40 years has evolved with our understanding of the immune response. Methods: We review the various mechanisms that have been proposed for this random polymer over the years, with emphasis on recent methods that utilize modern immunologic techniques. Results: Studies describing processes such as immune deviation and effects on regulatory T cells and antigen-presenting cells are presented. Conclusions: Effects of glatiramer acetate on the immune response have evolved as our technical abilities and knowledge of the immune response itself have developed.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalNeurology
Volume74
Issue numberSUPPL.
DOIs
StatePublished - Jan 2010

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Multiple Sclerosis
Immunologic Techniques
Relapsing-Remitting Multiple Sclerosis
Viral Tumor Antigens
Antigen-Presenting Cells
Regulatory T-Lymphocytes
Polymers
Glatiramer Acetate

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

Cite this

The mechanism of action of glatiramer acetate treatment in multiple sclerosis. / Racke, Michael K.; Lovett-Racke, Amy E.; Karandikar, Nitin J.

In: Neurology, Vol. 74, No. SUPPL., 01.2010.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Racke, Michael K. ; Lovett-Racke, Amy E. ; Karandikar, Nitin J. / The mechanism of action of glatiramer acetate treatment in multiple sclerosis. In: Neurology. 2010 ; Vol. 74, No. SUPPL.
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