The menagerie of neurology: Animal signs and the refinement of clinical acumen

Shin C Beh, Teresa Frohman, Elliot Frohman

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

1 Scopus citations

Abstract

Neurology is a field known for "eponymophilia." While eponym use has been a controversial issue in medicine, animal-related metaphoric descriptions continue to flourish in neurologic practice, particularly with the advent of neuroimaging. To provide practicing and trainee neurologists with a useful reference for all these colorful eponyms, we performed a literature review and summarized the various animal eponyms in the practice of neurology (and their etiologic implications) to date. We believe that the ability to recognize animallike attributes in clinical neurology and neuroradiology may be attributed to a visual phenomenon known as pareidolia. We propose that animal eponyms are a useful method of recognizing clinical and radiologic patterns that aid in the diagnostic process and therefore are effective aidesmémoire and communicative tools that enliven and improve the practice of neurology.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)E1-E9
JournalNeurology: Clinical Practice
Volume4
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Jun 2014

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Clinical Neurology

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