The natural history of B cells

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Multiple sclerosis is a common neurological disorder that represents a significant source of disability. B cells have recently emerged as a novel therapeutic target for multiple sclerosis. The natural development of B cells is characterized by an antigen-independent phase that occurs in the bone marrow and an antigen-dependent phase that takes place in the peripheral lymphoid tissue. The stage of B-cell development can be identified by the presence of specific cell surface markers. Checkpoints are in place to prevent self-reactive B cells from further development and activation. Some self-reactive B cells are able to escape these checkpoints, resulting in a loss of tolerance. B cells may contribute to systemic autoimmunity and the development of autoimmune disease via cytokine production, antigen presentation, and complement activation. In addition, B cells may trigger autoimmune disease via molecular mimicry, which occurs when a single B-cell receptor recognizes both a non-self antigen molecule and a self-molecule. Accumulating data suggest that ectopic proliferation of B cells in the central nervous system may also play a role. Further research is needed to elucidate the pathology of B cells and their role in central nervous system autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis.

Original languageEnglish (US)
JournalCurrent Opinion in Neurology
Volume21
Issue numberSUPPL. 1
DOIs
StatePublished - Apr 2008

Fingerprint

Natural History
B-Lymphocytes
Multiple Sclerosis
Antigens
Autoimmune Diseases
Autoimmune Diseases of the Nervous System
Molecular Mimicry
Complement Activation
Central Nervous System Diseases
Antigen Presentation
Lymphoid Tissue
Nervous System Diseases
Autoimmunity
Central Nervous System
Bone Marrow
Pathology
Cytokines

Keywords

  • Autoimmune
  • B cell
  • Ectopic
  • Gene modification
  • Germinal center

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)

Cite this

The natural history of B cells. / Monson, Nancy L.

In: Current Opinion in Neurology, Vol. 21, No. SUPPL. 1, 04.2008.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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