The network architecture of cortical processing in visuo-spatial reasoning

Shokri Kojori Ehsan, Michael A. Motes, Bart Rypma, Daniel Krawczyk

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

21 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Reasoning processes have been closely associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC), but specifically emerge from interactions among networks of brain regions. Yet it remains a challenge to integrate these brain-wide interactions in identifying the flow of processing emerging from sensory brain regions to abstract processing regions, particularly within PFC. Functional magnetic resonance imaging data were collected while participants performed a visuo-spatial reasoning task. We found increasing involvement of occipital and parietal regions together with caudal-rostral recruitment of PFC as stimulus dimensions increased. Brain-wide connectivity analysis revealed that interactions between primary visual and parietal regions predominantly influenced activity in frontal lobes. Caudal-to-rostral influences were found within left-PFC. Right-PFC showed evidence of rostral-to-caudal connectivity in addition to relatively independent influences from occipito-parietal cortices. In the context of hierarchical views of PFC organization, our results suggest that a caudal-to-rostral flow of processing may emerge within PFC in reasoning tasks with minimal top-down deductive requirements.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Article number411
JournalScientific Reports
Volume2
DOIs
StatePublished - 2012

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Prefrontal Cortex
Parietal Lobe
Brain
Occipital Lobe
Frontal Lobe
Magnetic Resonance Imaging

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • General

Cite this

The network architecture of cortical processing in visuo-spatial reasoning. / Ehsan, Shokri Kojori; Motes, Michael A.; Rypma, Bart; Krawczyk, Daniel.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 2, 411, 2012.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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