The nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis modulates the cardiopulmonary responses to central and peripheral drives related to exercise

Christopher A. Richard, Tony G. Waldrop, Robert M. Bauer, Jere H. Mitchell, Richard W. Stremel

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

14 Scopus citations

Abstract

It is known that muscle afferents and the hypothalamic locomotor region (HLR) both project to the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (NGC) and that the NGC is capable of influencing cardiovascular and respiratory variables. Therefore, the role of NGC in the cardiovascular and respiratory response to exercise-related signals was investigated in anesthesized cats. These signals were generated by stimulation of: (1) spinal ventral roots to induce hindlimb muscle contraction (MC) and (2) the HLR. Bilateral electrolytic lesion of the NGC at the pontomedullary border caused tidal volume, respiratory frequency and heart rate responses to HLR stimulation to be greater than the responses recorded prior to lesioning. Lesioning had no effect on the ventilatory or cardiovascular responses to MC but did decrease phrenic responsiveness; lesion had no effect on any resting values. In this preparation, the pontomedullary NGC acts as an inhibitory influence on tidal volume, breathing frequency and heart rate responses to the central command for exercise. In addition, NGC modulation of ventilation would appear to be selective for certain respiratory muscle groups.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)49-56
Number of pages8
JournalBrain Research
Volume482
Issue number1
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 13 1989

Keywords

  • Cardiopulmonary inhibition
  • Cat
  • Hypothalamic locomotor region
  • Muscular contraction
  • Phrenic activity
  • Reticular formation
  • Ventral root stimulation

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Neuroscience(all)
  • Molecular Biology
  • Clinical Neurology
  • Developmental Biology

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