The pathology of gastric cardia

A prospective, endoscopic, and morphologic study

Renzo Cestari, Vincenzo Villanacci, Gabrio Bassotti, Elisa Rossi, Domenico Della Casa, Guido Missale, Luigi Minelli, Paolo Cengia, Marco Gambarotti, Francesco Pirali, Francesco Donato, Robert M. Genta

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

20 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

"Carditis" (inflammation of the gastric cardiac mucosa) may be associated with gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD), whereas other studies argue that Helicobacter pylori could play a significant role in the chronic cardiac damage. We examined prospectively histologic features of gastric cardia, esophagitis, and H. pylori status in 204 consecutive subjects with GERD symptoms (57.3% male, 42.7% female mean age 49.2 y) undergoing upper gastrointestinal endoscopy with multiple biopsies in the distal esophagus, cardiac region, and stomach. These were assessed for esophagitis landmarks [Ismail Beigi grading (g0-3)], gastritis, and H. pylori infection (Sydney classification). The average symptom duration was 10.8 months. Endoscopy showed no erosive disease in 54.5% patients, grade "A" esophagitis in 37.6%, "B" in 8%, and "C" in 1 case. Histologic examination disclosed g0 in 8.3% patients, g1 in 78.4%, g2 in 12.8%, and g3 in 1; analysis of the cardia showed oxyntic mucosa in 27.9% patients and chronic cardiac mucosa inflammation in 72.1%. Carditis was significantly related to macroscopic esophagitis (P=0.044) and heartburn score (P=0.001). H. pylori cardiac infection was present in 27.4% cases (73.2% associated with cardiac mucosa). Gastric H. pylori infection was demonstrated in 35% patients. H. pylori in the cardiac region was associated with gastric H. pylori infection (P=0.001) and with paucity of GERD symptoms (P=0.05). A good correlation between carditis and GERD, concerning symptoms and macroscopic esophagitis was found in this study. H. pylori-related carditis is likely to be differently compared with the GERD-related type.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)706-710
Number of pages5
JournalAmerican Journal of Surgical Pathology
Volume31
Issue number5
DOIs
StatePublished - May 2007

Fingerprint

Cardia
Helicobacter pylori
Stomach
Esophagitis
Pathology
Gastroesophageal Reflux
Myocarditis
Helicobacter Infections
Mucous Membrane
Inflammation
Heartburn
Gastrointestinal Endoscopy
Gastritis
Gastric Mucosa
Esophagus
Endoscopy
Biopsy
Infection

Keywords

  • Cardia
  • Gastroesophageal reflux
  • Helicobacter pylori
  • Histology

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anatomy
  • Pathology and Forensic Medicine

Cite this

The pathology of gastric cardia : A prospective, endoscopic, and morphologic study. / Cestari, Renzo; Villanacci, Vincenzo; Bassotti, Gabrio; Rossi, Elisa; Casa, Domenico Della; Missale, Guido; Minelli, Luigi; Cengia, Paolo; Gambarotti, Marco; Pirali, Francesco; Donato, Francesco; Genta, Robert M.

In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology, Vol. 31, No. 5, 05.2007, p. 706-710.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Cestari, R, Villanacci, V, Bassotti, G, Rossi, E, Casa, DD, Missale, G, Minelli, L, Cengia, P, Gambarotti, M, Pirali, F, Donato, F & Genta, RM 2007, 'The pathology of gastric cardia: A prospective, endoscopic, and morphologic study', American Journal of Surgical Pathology, vol. 31, no. 5, pp. 706-710. https://doi.org/10.1097/PAS.0b013e31802c9dd5
Cestari, Renzo ; Villanacci, Vincenzo ; Bassotti, Gabrio ; Rossi, Elisa ; Casa, Domenico Della ; Missale, Guido ; Minelli, Luigi ; Cengia, Paolo ; Gambarotti, Marco ; Pirali, Francesco ; Donato, Francesco ; Genta, Robert M. / The pathology of gastric cardia : A prospective, endoscopic, and morphologic study. In: American Journal of Surgical Pathology. 2007 ; Vol. 31, No. 5. pp. 706-710.
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