The patient with penetrating injuries

Kimball I. Maull, Paul E Pepe

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Abstract

Penetrating injuries may be arbitrarily divided into wounds caused by sharp instruments, wounds caused by firearms, and impalements. Worldwide, stab wounds cause the greatest number of penetrating trauma casualties. In certain parts of the world, including the United States, the majority of penetrating wounds are caused by firearms [1]. Regardless of their etiology, most penetrating wounds result from interpersonal violence or violence that is self-inflicted. This fact has profound significance to prehospital rescue personnel, who usually have little initial insight into the circumstances surrounding the incident and who may be at considerable risk if the perpetrator(s) remain in the immediate vicinity. Coordination of rescue efforts between and among rescue personnel, law enforcement officials, and others in the community may be required to enable rescue efforts to safely proceed. While Do no harm may be the time-honored rule of trauma care, Protect thyself is always the first rule for the prehospital rescuers, who cannot do their job if they, too, fall victim to violence.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Title of host publicationPrehospital Trauma Care
PublisherCRC Press
Pages403-419
Number of pages17
ISBN (Electronic)9780824741785
ISBN (Print)9780824705374
StatePublished - Jan 1 2001

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Violence
Penetrating Wounds
Wounds and Injuries
Firearms
Stab Wounds
Law Enforcement

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

Maull, K. I., & Pepe, P. E. (2001). The patient with penetrating injuries. In Prehospital Trauma Care (pp. 403-419). CRC Press.

The patient with penetrating injuries. / Maull, Kimball I.; Pepe, Paul E.

Prehospital Trauma Care. CRC Press, 2001. p. 403-419.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingChapter

Maull, KI & Pepe, PE 2001, The patient with penetrating injuries. in Prehospital Trauma Care. CRC Press, pp. 403-419.
Maull KI, Pepe PE. The patient with penetrating injuries. In Prehospital Trauma Care. CRC Press. 2001. p. 403-419
Maull, Kimball I. ; Pepe, Paul E. / The patient with penetrating injuries. Prehospital Trauma Care. CRC Press, 2001. pp. 403-419
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