The PediSedate® device, a novel approach to pediatric sedation that provides distraction and inhaled nitrous oxide: Clinical evaluation in a large case series

William T. Denman, Pacifico M. Tuason, Mohammed I. Ahmed, Loralie M. Brennen, M. Soledad Cepeda, Daniel B. Carr

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

22 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Pediatric sedation is of paramount importance but can be challenging. Fear and anticipatory anxiety before invasive procedures often lead to uncooperativeness. A novel device (PediSedate®) provides sedation through a combination of inhaled nitrous oxide and distraction (video game). We evaluated the acceptability and safety of the PediSedate® device in children. Methods: We enrolled children between 3 and 9 years old who were scheduled to undergo surgical procedures that required general inhalational anesthesia. After the device was applied, he/she played a video game while listening to the audio portion of the game through the earphones. Nitrous oxide in oxygen was administered via the nasal piece of the headset starting at 50% and increasing to 70%, in 10% increments every 8 min. Treatment failures, vital signs, arterial oxygen saturation, depth of sedation, airway patency, side effects, acceptance of the device and parental satisfaction were all evaluated. Results: Of 100 children included, treatment failure occurred in 18% mainly because of poor tolerance of the device. At least 96% of the children who completed the study exhibited an excellent degree of sedation, 22% had side effects, and none experienced serious airway obstruction. Nausea and vomiting were the most common side effects and no patients had hemodynamic instability. Conclusions: The PediSedate® device combines nonpharmacologic with pharmacologic methods of sedation. Most of the children we evaluated were able to tolerate the PediSedate® device and achieved an adequate degree of sedation.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)162-166
Number of pages5
JournalPaediatric Anaesthesia
Volume17
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - Feb 1 2007

Fingerprint

Nitrous Oxide
Pediatrics
Equipment and Supplies
Video Games
Treatment Failure
Protective Devices
Oxygen
Vital Signs
Airway Obstruction
Nose
General Anesthesia
Nausea
Fear
Vomiting
Anxiety
Hemodynamics

Keywords

  • Analgesia
  • Children
  • Distraction
  • Nitrous oxide
  • Sedation
  • Sedation devices

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Anesthesiology and Pain Medicine
  • Pediatrics, Perinatology, and Child Health

Cite this

The PediSedate® device, a novel approach to pediatric sedation that provides distraction and inhaled nitrous oxide : Clinical evaluation in a large case series. / Denman, William T.; Tuason, Pacifico M.; Ahmed, Mohammed I.; Brennen, Loralie M.; Soledad Cepeda, M.; Carr, Daniel B.

In: Paediatric Anaesthesia, Vol. 17, No. 2, 01.02.2007, p. 162-166.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Denman, William T. ; Tuason, Pacifico M. ; Ahmed, Mohammed I. ; Brennen, Loralie M. ; Soledad Cepeda, M. ; Carr, Daniel B. / The PediSedate® device, a novel approach to pediatric sedation that provides distraction and inhaled nitrous oxide : Clinical evaluation in a large case series. In: Paediatric Anaesthesia. 2007 ; Vol. 17, No. 2. pp. 162-166.
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