The prognostic implications of plasma renin in essential hypertension

Norman M Kaplan

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

42 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

In 1972, the hypothesis was proposed that the chances of the major vascular complications of essential hypertension, myocardial infarction and stroke, developing in patients were directly related to the renin status of these patients. The basis for this thesis was the absence of such vascular complications over a 10 yr interval among 59 of 219 hypertensive patients who had low plasma renin levels, compared to an incidence of such vascular disease in 11% of 124 patients with normal levels of renin whose mean blood pressures when not receiving therapy were identical. Two broad implications have been made from the assumption that a low level of renin protects against vascular disease: drugs that raise renin levels are harmful; and therapy need not be so vigorously pursued in hypertensives with low levels of renin. The evidence on which the hypothesis was based and the data subsequently presented by other investigators are examined. It is concluded that the hypothesis that low renin levels protect against vascular complications is wrong and that normal renin levels are not inherently vasculotoxic.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)167-170
Number of pages4
JournalJournal of the American Medical Association
Volume231
Issue number2
DOIs
StatePublished - 1975

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Renin
Blood Vessels
Vascular Diseases
Essential Hypertension
Stroke
Myocardial Infarction
Research Personnel
Blood Pressure
Incidence
Therapeutics
Pharmaceutical Preparations

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Medicine(all)

Cite this

The prognostic implications of plasma renin in essential hypertension. / Kaplan, Norman M.

In: Journal of the American Medical Association, Vol. 231, No. 2, 1975, p. 167-170.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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