The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report: A psychometric evaluation in patients with asthma and major depressive disorder

E. Sherwood Brown, Michelle Murray, Thomas J. Carmody, Beth D. Kennard, Carroll W. Hughes, David A. Khan, A. John Rush

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

17 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Background: Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report (QIDS-SR 16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. Methods: The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Results: Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach a values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR 30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P < .001). The QIDS-SR16, IDS-SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = -0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. Conclusions: The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)433-438
Number of pages6
JournalAnnals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology
Volume100
Issue number5
StatePublished - May 2008

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Major Depressive Disorder
Psychometrics
Self Report
Asthma
Equipment and Supplies
Depression
Quality of Life
Citalopram
Outpatients
Placebos
Therapeutics

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Immunology and Allergy

Cite this

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title = "The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report: A psychometric evaluation in patients with asthma and major depressive disorder",
abstract = "Background: Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report (QIDS-SR 16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. Methods: The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Results: Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach a values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR 30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P < .001). The QIDS-SR16, IDS-SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = -0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. Conclusions: The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool.",
author = "Brown, {E. Sherwood} and Michelle Murray and Carmody, {Thomas J.} and Kennard, {Beth D.} and Hughes, {Carroll W.} and Khan, {David A.} and Rush, {A. John}",
year = "2008",
month = "5",
language = "English (US)",
volume = "100",
pages = "433--438",
journal = "Annals of Allergy, Asthma and Immunology",
issn = "1081-1206",
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T1 - The Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report

T2 - A psychometric evaluation in patients with asthma and major depressive disorder

AU - Brown, E. Sherwood

AU - Murray, Michelle

AU - Carmody, Thomas J.

AU - Kennard, Beth D.

AU - Hughes, Carroll W.

AU - Khan, David A.

AU - Rush, A. John

PY - 2008/5

Y1 - 2008/5

N2 - Background: Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report (QIDS-SR 16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. Methods: The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Results: Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach a values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR 30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P < .001). The QIDS-SR16, IDS-SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = -0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. Conclusions: The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool.

AB - Background: Despite the high co-occurrence between depression and asthma, few studies have addressed methods assessing the severity of depressive symptoms among patients with asthma. Objective: To evaluate the psychometric properties of the Quick Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology-Self-report (QIDS-SR 16), a 16-item measure of depressive symptom severity, in patients with asthma. Methods: The psychometric properties of the QIDS-SR16 were compared at treatment exit with those of the 30-item self-report Inventory of Depressive Symptomatology (IDS-SR30) and the 17-item clinician-rated Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HRSD17) in 73 outpatients with asthma who were treated with citalopram or placebo for nonpsychotic major depressive disorder. Correlations between the depression rating scales and the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire were calculated. Results: Internal consistency at exit was strong for the QIDS-SR16 (Cronbach a values are .87 for the QIDS-SR16, .95 for the IDS-SR 30, and .87 for the HRSD17). The QIDS-SR16 and HRSD17 total scores were highly correlated (r = 0.85), as were the QIDS-SR16 and IDS-SR30 total scores (r = 0.97). All QIDS-SR16 item total score correlations were significant (P < .001). The QIDS-SR16, IDS-SR30, and HRSD17 showed comparable sensitivity to symptom change, indicating high concurrent validity for all 3 scales. The total QIDS-SR16 baseline to exit change score demonstrated a significant negative correlation (r = -0.49, P < .001) with the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire. Thus, greater depressive symptom severity was associated with lower asthma-related quality of life. Conclusions: The QIDS-SR16 showed good reliability and impressive construct validity. Strong psychometric properties of this brief self-report format and its sensitivity to treatment change suggest that the QIDS-SR16 is a valuable clinical tool.

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